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How to turn these symmetric equations into the general form?

  1. Dec 12, 2014 #1
    I was solving this problem ImageUploadedByPhysics Forums1418428585.222891.jpg

    and I didn't want to do it the really long way by finding the equation of B(t) by first finding T(t) and N(t). So i took the cross product of r' and r'' so that they would be in the direction of B. Found the parametric equation of the plane but the book answer was in the general format. ImageUploadedByPhysics Forums1418428883.823746.jpg

    How do I turn this into the general format to check my answer? It should be 2X +Y +4Z -7 = 0

    Whenever I try i just get two equations that don't mix to give me x y and z in one equation but it should be right.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 12, 2014 #2

    Dick

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    That's not the equation of a plane. It's the equation of a line. You might want to try the long way.
     
  4. Dec 12, 2014 #3
    Why can't you do it my way? I know it works, i've done it on other problems. My teacher's done it like that before too.
     
  5. Dec 12, 2014 #4

    Dick

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    I don't know what you are doing. Can you show us?
     
  6. Dec 12, 2014 #5
    Redid it to make it a bit clearer

    ImageUploadedByPhysics Forums1418431044.682652.jpg
     
  7. Dec 12, 2014 #6

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    I'm with Dick here. The symmetric equations you show in post #1 are for a line, not a plane.
     
  8. Dec 12, 2014 #7

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    In your 2nd attachment, under "Normal Plane" you have (12, -16, -2)t (1, 1, 1). That can't be the equation of a plane, because (1) it's not an equation, and (2) there should be two parameters, not just one, in the parametric form of the equation of a plane.
     
  9. Dec 12, 2014 #8
    Ooo right. Damn, I forgot a lot from linear. Literally not a plane with only 1 parameter. Ok thanks
     
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