How would one get a salt to react with water.

  • Thread starter Qaiphyx
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  • #1
Qaiphyx
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In such that the same manner as alkali metals I would presume?
 
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  • #2
SteamKing
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It's not clear what you mean. Salts are generally non-reactive compounds, at least with water.

The reason alkali metals are so reactive (esp. with water) is due to having a single electron as a valence electron. Once an alkali metal has reacted with another element, for example, to forma salt, the compound thus formed is usually chemically stable and will no longer react with other substances.
 
  • #3
Qaiphyx
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It's not clear what you mean. Salts are generally non-reactive compounds, at least with water.

The reason alkali metals are so reactive (esp. with water) is due to having a single electron as a valence electron. Once an alkali metal has reacted with another element, for example, to forma salt, the compound thus formed is usually chemically stable and will no longer react with other substances.

Is there a way to charge the salt so that it would have the same reactivity?
 
  • #4
SteamKing
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If you run an electrical current through a salt solution, you will electrolyze the salt and break it down into its elemental constituents.

I still don't know what you are getting at. An alkali metal is pretty reactive when dropped into water. All a salt will do is dissolve.

Perhaps a refresher (or a first time course) in chemistry would help.
 

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