I heard the ITER could achieve Q = 10, what about the engineering (actual) Q?

  • Thread starter zheng89120
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  • #1
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If the engineering Q is greater than 1.1 or so, does that mean the fusion problem has been theoretically solved?
 

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  • #2
Drakkith
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If the engineering Q is greater than 1.1 or so, does that mean the fusion problem has been theoretically solved?
I believe so.
 
  • #3
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If the engineering Q is greater than 1.1 or so, does that mean the fusion problem has been theoretically solved?
The enormous investment alone should have told you that. No-one gets a blank check (15 billion dollars spent so far) just to play with magnets. ITER is as big a deal as the Fermi pile was in its day. Bigger, actually.
 
  • #4
Khashishi
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When fusion is working with net energy gain, it still needs to be able to compete economically. For that, we'll probably need a Q considerably greater than 1.1
 

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