I remember when I was young I saw people emptying the water from their

In summary, the siphon works by first filling the tube with a little bit of water and making a U shape, then you close the 2 ends with your thumbs and put the tube in the tank and somehow it begins to suck the water out of the tank.
  • #1
equilibrum
24
0
I remember when I was young I saw people emptying the water from their tanks using a flexible tube(without any pumps or other mechanical device). If I am not wrong, you first fill the tube with a little bit of water and make a U shape,then you close the 2 ends with your thumbs and put the tube in the tank and somehow it begins to suck the water out of the tank.

I'm curious to know what causes this? I thought of Bernoulli's principle/effect but I don't really understand the explanation on Wikipedia. Never learned anything about it in school either.

Can anyone explain this to me? In simple terms and/or with simple formulas please. Just wanted to know :D
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2


If you Google "siphon", I think you will get everything you need to know.
 
  • #3


Vanadium 50 said:
If you Google "siphon", I think you will get everything you need to know.

That explained a lot ^^ still a little confused about hydrostatic pressure though.
 
  • #4


First you need to fill the tube to the highest point and then the water will flow if the end of the tube is lower from the surface of the fluid in the tank. And and the speed of the water flowing out will depend of the potential (hight) difference(H) between the surface of the water of the tank (first section) and the opening of the tube (that will be our second section).

If we suppose that the thank and open end of the tube are open to the a atmospheric pressure and speed of the surface of the fluid in the tank is near zero then the Bernoulli equation will become:
[tex]\rho[/tex]v2/2g=H
from that
v=[tex]\sqrt{}2gH[/tex]
If the hight deference (H) is 0 then then the speed will be 0, so no water will flow.
 
  • #5


vlado_skopsko said:
First you need to fill the tube to the highest point and then the water will flow if the end of the tube is lower from the surface of the fluid in the tank. And and the speed of the water flowing out will depend of the potential (hight) difference(H) between the surface of the water of the tank (first section) and the opening of the tube (that will be our second section).

If we suppose that the thank and open end of the tube are open to the a atmospheric pressure and speed of the surface of the fluid in the tank is near zero then the Bernoulli equation will become:
[tex]\rho[/tex]v2/2g=H
from that
v=[tex]\sqrt{}2gH[/tex]
If the hight deference (H) is 0 then then the speed will be 0, so no water will flow.

thanks for the two equations! i am playing around with them. Just to check, v = velocity of fluid , g = 9.81m/s^2 and p = fluid density?
 
  • #6


Yes. At first how the siphon works is a little bit counterintuitive.
 
  • #7


vlado_skopsko said:
Yes. At first how the siphon works is a little bit counterintuitive.

Yeah cause it seems to go against gravity. It's fine though :)
 

Related to I remember when I was young I saw people emptying the water from their

1. What were people emptying the water from?

People were emptying the water from various sources such as buckets, basins, or containers.

2. Why were people emptying the water?

People were emptying the water to remove excess water from a certain area or to transfer it to a different location.

3. Where did you see people emptying the water?

I saw people emptying the water in various places such as their homes, gardens, or public areas.

4. Was this a common practice when you were young?

Yes, it was a common practice when I was young as there were limited methods of removing water such as using buckets or draining systems.

5. What methods did people use to empty the water?

People used various methods such as manually scooping the water out with buckets, using pumps or draining systems, or using natural methods like evaporation or absorption.

Similar threads

Replies
13
Views
2K
  • DIY Projects
Replies
8
Views
3K
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Mechanics
Replies
18
Views
4K
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • DIY Projects
2
Replies
39
Views
9K
Back
Top