1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

IMPACT FORCE of a ball in an inclined plane

  1. Jul 7, 2013 #1
    1. What would be the effect on the impact force of a lower or higher release point of a metal ball in an inclined plane.



    2. I don't know what to do here.. or how to answer. My teacher told us to include formulas to prove our answers.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 8, 2013 #2

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Welcome to PF;
    Impacts don't properly have a force ... so what would the question be referring to?
    You would not normally release things from inside an inclined plane either... I think you need to take a more careful look at the problem: where is the ball released from? where is the inclined plane? Does the ball travel along the plane or does it strike the plane? What are the forces involved? What physical laws would apply?
     
  4. Jul 8, 2013 #3
    Thank you

    Hello po! Thank you for this! we have an experiment, The setup looks like the attach file. The metal elbow track isn't on a table or anything it is hanging on the iron stand with the help of the clamps and all. then as we released the ball, the metal track tilted. We are suppose to explain why it did. (it was tightly connected. PROMISE) I am so sorry. I am not really good in this. >.< But here is the methodology.

    Methodology:
    1. Set-up your materials as shown on the figure above. Make sure that the elbow track is parallel to the ground and that the photogate detector/sensor is vertically aligned to the edge of the elbow track. Temporarily place the metal ball at the edge of the track and secure the photogate on the iron stand such that the center of the ball and the photogate detector are of the same level. Secure the plumb bob to where the photogate sensor is and make sure that the plumb bob just touches the floor.
    2. Open Logger Pro 3.8.4. Go to File/Open. Click on Probes and Sensors/Photogates/One Gate Timer.
    3. Go to Set-Up/Data Collection. Click on Sampling. Change the length of the metal ball to 0.019 m.
    4. Check if the Photogate is working by looking at the Status Bar located at the bottom of your screen. It should read “Unblocked”.
    5. Block the Photogate with your hand, the status bar should change to “Blocked”. Remove your hand and the status bar should change to “Unblocked”.
    Case I: Released from the top-end of the elbow track
    6. Measure the vertical distance, h, from the photogate detector to where your plumb bob touches the floor. This is your y for the experiment.
    7. Approximate where the metal ball will land on the floor.
    8. Position the metal ball at the top-end of the elbow track.
    9. Click on the COLLECT button and wait for the toolbar to change to STOP and then, slide the metal ball down the ramp.
    10. Place your “carbonized paper” where the metal ball landed and secure it on the floor using a tape.
    11. For every trial, label properly the markings of the metal ball on your carbonized paper.
    12. Measure the distance from the marked point to where the plumb bob touches the floor. This distance is your x.
    13. Record the value of the initial velocity, ox, from the table on the right-hand side of your monitor. Use up to 3 decimal places.
    14. Complete the remaining trials by rolling the metal ball down the ramp. (NOTE: There is no need to click on the STOP button every time you do a trial. All trials for each case will be under one file).
    15. After completing all the trials, save your file under filename: Case1.
    Case II: Released from the middle-part of the elbow track
    16. Place a tape at the middle-part of the incline of your elbow track. This will be your point of release for Case 2.
    17. Repeat steps 7 to 14.
    18. After completing all the trials, save your file under filename: Case2.
    Completing your data table
    19. Get the average of the velocity from the Photogate and the average of your measured range. Record the value up to 3 decimal places.
    20. Compute for the time of flight using an appropriate equation for the vertical motion of the projectile. Record the value up to 3 decimal places.
    21. To compute for the average horizontal velocity of the projectile, ox (theoretical), use an appropriate equation for the horizontal motion of the projectile. Record the value up to 3 decimal places.
    22. Compare the two average velocities and determine the percentage error. Express in 2 decimal places.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Jul 8, 2013 #4

    Simon Bridge

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Filipino?
    Hello po, kumusta na? :D
    The experiment setup makes all the difference ... in plain language, then, would the question want to know how the starting position (up the incline) affects how hard the ball strikes the ground?
    The setup suggests that you consider it in terms of change in momentum... (note: Looks like "force of impact" means "impulse", i.e. change in momentum.)

    Tagay.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2013
  6. Jul 9, 2013 #5
    Yes

    Yes po, FILIPINO :) Thank you very much!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: IMPACT FORCE of a ball in an inclined plane
Loading...