In what ways do the three terms differ?

  • Thread starter louislaolu
  • Start date
  • #1
louislaolu
5
0
non-relativistic physics,classical mechanics and low speed physics
I think these three terms are synonyms, but I am not sure whether there is any stylistic difference between them?
Is "low speed physics" informal or outdated or non-standardized compared with the other two?
Please teach me if you know their difference.
Thanks!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Orodruin
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
20,004
10,649
Non-relativistic physics is anything that does not apply special or general relativity.
Classical mechanics is classical mechanics and is a non-relativistic theory.
An example of a theory that is non-relativistic but that is not classical mechanics is basic quantum mechanics.
 
  • Like
Likes PeroK and topsquark
  • #3
louislaolu
5
0
Non-relativistic physics is anything that does not apply special or general relativity.
Classical mechanics is classical mechanics and is a non-relativistic theory.
An example of a theory that is non-relativistic but that is not classical mechanics is basic quantum mechanics.
Thank you for the reply, Orodruin. Is it correct to say that non-relativistic physics is a broader concept than classical mechanics.
What about the term "low speed physics"? Do people still or ever use it?
 
  • #4
Orodruin
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
20,004
10,649
Thank you for the reply, Orodruin. Is it correct to say that non-relativistic physics is a broader concept than classical mechanics.
Yes.
What about the term "low speed physics"? Do people still or ever use it?
I don't know who "people" are, but I don't think I have ever encountered that term as a general nomenclature for something.
 
  • #5
louislaolu
5
0
I mean experts or scientists by "people". (English is not my native language, so I often fail to say what I mean)
Your explanation helps me a lot. Thank you so much!
 
  • #6
PeroK
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
2022 Award
23,748
15,358
What about the term "low speed physics"? Do people still or ever use it?
It might be applied to those who take a long time to learn. Ironically, there's quite a lot of low speed physics in the relativity forum on here!
 
  • #7
vela
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Education Advisor
15,758
2,395
Classical mechanics is classical mechanics and is a non-relativistic theory.
Some people would include relativistic mechanics as part of classical mechanics.
 
  • #8
Orodruin
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
20,004
10,649
Some people would include relativistic mechanics as part of classical mechanics.
That is also acceptable to the effect of relativity being a classical theory (as opposed to a quantum theory).
 
  • #9
louislaolu
5
0
It might be applied to those who take a long time to learn. Ironically, there's quite a lot of low speed physics in the relativity forum on here!
Thanks. What an interesting interpretation! I can come up with a new one: snail physics:smile:
 
  • #10
louislaolu
5
0
Some people would include relativistic mechanics as part of classical mechanics.
Thanks.
I am trying to figure out why "low speed physics" in a science fiction was rendered into "classical mechanics (non-relativistic physics)" after the work was translated from Chinese into English. I assume that the translator meant to standardize the original term, but I have no evidence. I feel a canonical view of these terms might account for this better in this context.
 
Last edited:

Suggested for: In what ways do the three terms differ?

Replies
3
Views
271
Replies
45
Views
602
Replies
6
Views
354
Replies
12
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
256
Replies
9
Views
443
Replies
3
Views
17
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
489
Replies
52
Views
2K
Top