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Homework Help: Industrial Uses for Nuclear Energy?

  1. May 13, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    I can't figure out any Industrial Uses for Nuclear Energy.....


    2. Relevant equations
    N/A


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I know that domestic uses would be that it creates Electricity for our homes..but what are the industrial uses?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 13, 2010 #2

    mgb_phys

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    it creates Electricity for our factories?
     
  4. May 13, 2010 #3
    But that's Domestic usage.

    Ok, then what would a domestic usage be? :P
     
  5. May 13, 2010 #4
    Electricity in our homes.
     
  6. May 13, 2010 #5
    It just makes electricity as an alternative to burning fossil fuels then, yes? It doesn't do anything else domestically or industrially.
     
  7. May 13, 2010 #6

    mgb_phys

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    Pretty much, in ships you can use the turbines to directly drive the propeller but on modern ships it would probably still make electricity to drive azipods.

    There was an idea to use a reactor to generate steam for oil sands extraction but sanity prevailed.
     
  8. May 14, 2010 #7

    Borek

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    What about production of isotopes?
     
  9. May 14, 2010 #8

    Pengwuino

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    Bah beat me to it! Reactors are indeed sources of radioactive samples used in various medical fields.
     
  10. May 14, 2010 #9

    Borek

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    And smoke detectors. And killing KGB defectors. And self illuminated clocks. Many practical uses.
     
  11. May 14, 2010 #10
    Nuclear Energy is used to make Smoke Detectors work?

    -------

    What are some Industrial uses for Kinetic Energy? lol? Frustrating me and I can't do this.
     
  12. May 14, 2010 #11

    Borek

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  13. May 15, 2010 #12
    I don't get it xD
     
  14. May 15, 2010 #13

    Borek

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    In short: isotope radiation makes the air ionized. Air resistivity is a function of number of ions. Presence of smoke changes the ionization level. You measure air resistivity - when there is a sudden change, you detected smoke some contamination, most likely smoke.

    --
     
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