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Inertail versus gravitational mass

  1. Jul 18, 2006 #1
    Hi,

    Inertial mass can be understood as the resistance to change motion. Gravitational mass exerts a pull on every other object (and as a result of action-reaction force law also on itself). It has been shown by experiment that both mass concepts are the same. But it looks strange that one quantity is a resistance to motion and cause of motion at the same time.

    Would it not be more logical to assume that there exists a natural motion of scattering all things and that mass is a reverse motion (a kind of friction) that resists this natural motion of scattering.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 18, 2006 #2

    Office_Shredder

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    No, it wouldn't.

    For one thing, your version of mass still has the same problem, that mass is both stopping the object from moving, yet causing other objects to move.

    In fact, that gravitational and inertial mass is the same makes the laws of gravity really cool
     
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