Initial Velocity Question

  • Thread starter MaNiFeST
  • Start date
  • #51
3,042
15
Not quite...... What I wanted you to do, although a little bit hard to spot, is notice that when you DOUBLE the final stop height from 5m to 10m, the velocity increases NOT by a factor of 2, but by a factor of [tex]\sqrt(2)[/tex].

Do you see this?
 
  • #52
36
0
sorry i dont really follow
 
  • #53
3,042
15
Look at the change in height.

10m/5m = 2 <-- you DOUBLED the height it stopped at

14.007/9.9045= 1.4142 <--does NOT, does NOT, does NOT DOUBLE.

1.4142 = sqrt(2) <--it changes by the square ROOT of the change in height.
 
  • #54
3,042
15
Try it for a different change in heights and see if it works.
 
  • #55
36
0
15/5 = 3
9904*sqrt(3) = 17.154
It works!
Thanks dude
 
  • #56
3,042
15
Go back over everything we did, print it out, and show it to your teacher.

You will get your bonus. You solved this on your own.
 
  • #57
36
0
I didnt really do this on my own, but thanks dude, you really helped me!

Yeah i do understand this, ill have to remember last part, but tricky
 
Last edited:
  • #58
3,042
15
Yes, go back over this tomorrow and make sure you understand every step. If you dont, ask me more questions until you UNDERSTAND it.
 
  • #59
36
0
Hey, i found out that we can use a protractor on the lab. I read some where that you can use a proctractor to find out the distance or height of something from ground level.

I tried searching google but didnt really find anything, do you have a helpful tutorial or maybe some tips on using a protractor to determine the height of something launched 90 degress into the air?
 
  • #60
286
0
I do a lab with a water balloon slingshot with my students... I'm sorry, but there's no realistic way you're going to measure the vertical displacement with a meter stick... There's nothing nearby for reference; the water balloon goes well above the height of the school and any other vertical reference point. It's not much different than suggesting to someone that they can measure the vertical height a model rocket reaches by using a meter stick. (well, a rocket usually goes much higher, but regardless, you're well out of the range where using a meter stick would be a reasonable suggestion.)

Manifest, I was going to suggest to you that you could stand at a distance from the waterballoon slingshot, then aim the meter stick toward the highest point the balloon reaches. Constructing a smaller triangle from where the meter stick is pointing, you could use similar triangles to calculate the maximum height of the waterballoon. However, now that you're allowed to use a protractor, right triangle trig simplifies the work you're going to have to do (slightly).

btw, I appreciate this thread... after calculating an initial velocity, my students then have to calculate a horizontal range after pulling an angle out of a hat. (I stand at their calculate point, getting soaked if all goes well.) Students are notoriously horrible at getting accurate times with a stopwatch.

You'll definitely want to use the formula that cyrusabdollahi led you to. However, I agree with your skepticism toward getting credit for suggesting that you measure the vertical displacement with a meter stick.
 
  • #61
36
0
Yeah, my last post indicated that i could use a protractor , but after googling , i do not know how to measure displacement or distance for a vertical length using one

Would you happen to have a tutorial or maybe some helpful tips on this process?
 
  • #62
286
0
Have you learned about sin, cos, and tangent? The protractor can be used to measure the angle between the ground and the balloon, if you stand a distance away from the launcher. Measure this distance as well, and draw a right triangle. You'll have the bottom of the right triangle, an acute angle, and of course, the 90 degree angle at the launcher. Simple right triangle trig can be used to solve for the vertical side of the triangle.
 
  • #63
36
0
ok thanks drpizza, yeah i have learned about sin,cos tan, though this will be hard measuring it in a matter of seconds
 

Related Threads on Initial Velocity Question

  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
879
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
871
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
Top