Inventor claims to have built device that can see through walls.

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  • #26
Ivan Seeking
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INFRARED IMAGER AND IR THERMAL CAMERA CATALOG
...Thermal images cannot see through walls, although you can gather much information about the inside of the wall as well as what is happening on the other side of the wall. For example you would not be able to see people and plants involved in an illicit indoor growing operation from the outside of the building. You would be able to see and monitor the heat escaping from the building that would be a telltale sign of an indoor growing operation. Click here for legal cases involving thermal infrared for narcotics detection You would also be able to see things like studs inside the walls, or damaged insulation in roofing applications. We hope that dispels a few of the most common myths regarding infrared energy. Thermal imagers in Hollywood and in real life are very different. The remainder of this paper will focus on the real life thermal imagers and how they work...
http://www.ir55.com/milcam.html [Broken]
 
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  • #27
Cliff_J
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Featured on TechTV and I had to look up the article myself, now a thread on here. Hmm, sounds an aweful lot like the typical "science regengade shows all" article with miracle properties. Especially with the "...defied all known rules of physics..." comment.

I'll give the guy this much credit, his antics have given him a lot of press exposure. One show from the science channel went to watch a test of his armor as observed by a rep from the military and so on. Nevermind that other companies show practical armor that doesn't need 6" to encompass 60 layers of steel/aluminum/kevlar and so on to accomplish this level of protection, instead he claims it'll work in the current conflicts for cheap and gets press coverage. :confused:

Best part of the bear suit is the flimsy hinged helmet for the wearer. Loosing an apendage would be bad enough but the one on top kinda tops the priority list. :smile:
 
  • #28
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Moonbear said:
Now there's a practical invention. :rolleyes: Yep, I think I'm going to head out for a nice leisurely stroll in the woods on this beautiful summer day; I better strap on that 150 lb bear-proof suit. :yuck: And if you know you're going to be working around grizzlies, such as at a zoo, don't you want to be as agile as possible to get the task done quickly, before the anesthesia wears off?
That's the problem I have with the thing. It kind of strikes me as a neat idea *in theory.* In practice though, I can think of very few situations in which the bear suit is the best alternative. A tranquilizer gun, running like heck, not entering a cage with a ticked off grizzly, etc. all seem to be better, cheaper, and lighter options.
 
  • #29
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Grogs said:
That's the problem I have with the thing. It kind of strikes me as a neat idea *in theory.* In practice though, I can think of very few situations in which the bear suit is the best alternative. A tranquilizer gun, running like heck, not entering a cage with a ticked off grizzly, etc. all seem to be better, cheaper, and lighter options.
Yep, just staying home is much safer IMO.
 
  • #30
Ivan Seeking
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I once heard that bears don't like the sound of two large rocks pounded together; allegedly an old Indian [native American] trick. Does anyone know if this is true?
 
  • #31
Oh my... I heard the inventor in an interview on Coast to Coast. He's a total nutjob. He claims to have "loads of friends" in the scientific community several of which are nobel lauriats as well as "loads of friends" in the military whom he has come over to his lab and sweep for bugs which crop up regularly. Ofcourse he also states that Navy Seals couldn't get into his place if they tried due to all the boobie traps. He says that he's been attacked by three bears (before the bear suit) and shot and stabbed several times. The best part was when he said that he gets lots of help from his scientist friends since they know that he knows nothing about science. He was absolutely hilarious.
 
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  • #32
Chronos
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Boobie traps? Is that like putting flypaper in your girlfriend's bra?
 
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  • #33
matthyaouw
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TheStatutoryApe said:
He says that he's been attacked by three bears (before the bear suit) and shot and stabbed several times.
I'm not surprised. If you saw him wandering around in his bear-proof suit, wouldn't you just shoot him to prove the point that it is useless/for your own amusement?
 
  • #34
A Hoax

I believe this is a hoax. Not only does it go against the laws of physics, but the article is poorly written. The structure is incorrect, (i.e. punctuation) and there are typographical errors throughout the article. I'm not perfect at writing, but any editor would see that there are spelling mistakes that should have been addressed.

Though some of his claims like killing fish and losing feeling in his fingers is highly possible with this device the overall claim points to a hoax due to the lack of proof. A radar with high enough power can roast a bird out of the sky, which is what I believed happened in the case of killing the fish and damage to his finger. He basically cooked them... That is if the device actually was in existance.

PsychoSquirrel
 

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