Investigating the Young's Modulus of certain materials

In summary, the conversation is about investigating the Young's Modulus of certain materials and how temperature affects it. The hypothesis is that increasing the temperature will lower the Young's Modulus, but it can also be increased by reducing the temperature into the cryogenic range. Other factors that could affect the Young's Modulus, such as yield and tensile strength, are also mentioned. It is stated that temperature is the only factor that affects the Young's Modulus. The possibility of observing a measurable change in E using standard equipment is also discussed, with a graph provided as evidence. The conversation ends with gratitude for the helpful information.
  • #1
calum
5
0
I am investigating the Young's Modulus of certain materials and what factors have an effect on the Young's Modulus of materials.

I am going to be altering the temperature, my hypothesis being that increasing the temperature will lower the E of the materials.

Are there other factors I could investigate that would have an effect?
 
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  • #2
Hi calum,
Yes, increasing temperature will lower E slightly. Conversely, reducing temperature well into the cryogenic range increases E. But it isn't a huge amount. Yield and tensile strength for example, are much more heavily influenced by temperature.

To answer your question, I don't think there's any other factors that affects E other than temperature.
 
  • #3
Q_Goest said:
Hi calum,
Yes, increasing temperature will lower E slightly. Conversely, reducing temperature well into the cryogenic range increases E. But it isn't a huge amount. Yield and tensile strength for example, are much more heavily influenced by temperature.

To answer your question, I don't think there's any other factors that affects E other than temperature.

Ok thanks for your help. You say E is lowered slightly, do you think it would be possible to observe a measurable change in E using quite standard equiptment?
 
  • #4
Attached is a graph of modulus versus temperature for steel, taken from MIL-HDBK-5. As you can see, the modulus changes, and it should be measurable.
 

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  • #5
Q_Goest said:
Attached is a graph of modulus versus temperature for steel, taken from MIL-HDBK-5. As you can see, the modulus changes, and it should be measurable.

That's great thanks, really helpful thanks for your help :)
 

Related to Investigating the Young's Modulus of certain materials

1. What is the Young's Modulus of a material?

The Young's Modulus is a measure of the stiffness or elasticity of a material. It is the ratio of stress (force per unit area) to strain (change in length per unit length) in a material when subjected to tensile or compressive forces.

2. How is the Young's Modulus determined?

The Young's Modulus is typically determined through a tensile test, where a material is subjected to increasing amounts of stress until it reaches its breaking point. The stress and corresponding strain values are then used to calculate the Young's Modulus.

3. What is the significance of the Young's Modulus?

The Young's Modulus is an important material property as it helps engineers and scientists understand how a material will behave under different types of stress. It also allows for the selection of appropriate materials for different applications.

4. How does the Young's Modulus vary among different materials?

The Young's Modulus can vary greatly among different materials. For example, metals tend to have higher Young's Modulus values compared to rubber or other polymers. This is due to differences in the molecular structure and bonding within each material.

5. Can the Young's Modulus of a material change?

Yes, the Young's Modulus of a material can change under certain conditions. For example, high temperatures can cause materials to become more flexible and decrease their Young's Modulus. Additionally, repeated stress or deformation can also affect the Young's Modulus of a material.

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