Is a bicycle or dirtbike an example of f=ma?

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between F = ma and a dirt bike or bicycle. The force applied by the pedals of a bicycle is a good example of this principle, but the force produced by the engine of a dirt bike also follows this law. The point where the wheel pushes off the ground is referred to as the "contact patch" and the torque on the wheel affects the backwards horizontal force applied to the ground. Overall, the conversation delves into the physics of these vehicles and how they demonstrate Newton's Laws.
  • #1
fourthlaw
3
0
Hey all - this is my first post so I mght as well say hi -

I'm not very smart, but find everyday physics interesting. I tried to look up Newton's Laws, but I can't figure out:

Is a dirt bike or bicycle a good example of the f=ma principle?

All the info I found states that the force is a 'pushing' force, i.e, someone pushing the object. I can see the bicycle with the pedals fitting the explanation, but is a dirtbike an example of this law?

Also, is there a name for the point where the wheel pushes off the ground (propulsion? inertia?) Thanks.
 
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  • #2
The interaction between the wheel and the ground is called torque. Torque is the rotational analogue of force. A dirt bike is a good example of F = m A, because the engine produces a force (in the pistons) which produces a torque (through the cams) which rotates the chain which produces a torque on a wheel which rotates the wheeel which produces and acceleration of the bike as a whole.
 
  • #3
ok - I thought so! Thanks for your help.
 
  • #4
fourthlaw said:
Also, is there a name for the point where the wheel pushes off the ground.
The name for the "point" is "contact patch", where the tire is in contact with the ground. The torque on the wheel, divided by the radius of the tire equals the backwards horizontal force applied to the ground. The ground "reacts" with an equal and opposite forwards force and this force / mass of (rider + vehicle) = acceleration.
 
  • #5
The name for the "point" is "contact patch", where the tire is in contact with the ground. The torque on the wheel, divided by the radius of the tire equals the backwards horizontal force applied to the ground. The ground "reacts" with an equal and opposite forwards force and this force / mass of (rider + vehicle) = acceleration.
When I first read that I was like ":eek:!", but once I read it again it made sense. Thanks. :approve:
 

Related to Is a bicycle or dirtbike an example of f=ma?

1. Is a bicycle an example of f=ma?

Yes, a bicycle is an example of f=ma. The force applied by the rider on the pedals (f) produces a forward acceleration (a) of the bicycle's mass (m).

2. Is a dirtbike an example of f=ma?

Yes, a dirtbike is also an example of f=ma. The force generated by the engine (f) causes the dirtbike to accelerate (a) according to its mass (m).

3. How does f=ma apply to a bicycle and dirtbike?

F=ma, also known as Newton's second law of motion, explains the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration. In the case of a bicycle and dirtbike, the force applied to the vehicle (f) results in an acceleration (a) based on the mass (m) of the vehicle.

4. Are there any other factors that affect f=ma for a bicycle and dirtbike?

Yes, there are other factors that can affect f=ma for a bicycle and dirtbike, such as friction, air resistance, and the terrain on which the vehicle is being ridden. These factors can influence the amount of force needed to accelerate the vehicle and the resulting acceleration.

5. Can f=ma be applied to other vehicles or objects?

Yes, f=ma can be applied to any object or vehicle that is experiencing a force and acceleration. It is a fundamental principle in physics and can be used to understand the motion of various objects, from cars and airplanes to planets and stars.

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