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Engineering Is composite material engineering booming?

  1. Aug 10, 2017 #1
    Greetings,

    I’m currently in the critical stages of my career right now and I really want to chose the best career option out there which suits my strength.

    My strength is doing R&D and I prefer computers and design simulation software like Ansys,Matlab,AutoCAD.I love thermodynamics,fluid dynamics and Strengths of Materials and lots of differential calculus.

    Personality wise I have a very scrupulous nature and prefer perfection, so I love working on things that require attention to detail.

    I'm a huge Space enthusiast and love Aerospace Engineering.But I dont have much attraction towards engines.So I gathered some information online and think that Composite Engineering in Aerospace would suit my job needs.

    But I’m unsure whether this field has high prospects for future?And would this really suit me?So I’m thinking of doing an research internship in a US university for a month and check out my interest in the field.

    Any views is appreciated.
    Thanking you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 11, 2017 #2

    CWatters

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    I recently asked a recruitment consultant in the UK what staff were most in demand where he was based. His answer was "drive train engineers" and "composite materials engineers". However he recruits for companies near Silverstone the home of motor racing and related industries such as aerospace.
     
  4. Aug 11, 2017 #3
    Just curious does a composite engineer require a strong background in chemistry?
     
  5. Aug 11, 2017 #4

    CWatters

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    Not sure. I thought it was all about how to design structures that were strong enough without adding weight, so you need to know about stress & strain, bending moments, lay-up/laminating procedures etc.

    The person I spoke to said companies were 3D printing some parts used on racing cars so CAD experience also useful.
     
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