Is it possible to create a two-seasonal global climate calendar as a statistical model of some physical property of the Earth's upper atmosphere?

  • #1
Is it possible to create a two-seasonal global climate calendar as a statistical model of some physical property of earth's upper air, independent from interacting factors such as topography, elevation, latitude, nearby water, ocean currents, vegetation and prevailing winds? The beginning of the season should be the moment when the climatic conditions in the southern and northern hemispheres of the Planet Earth equalize.
 

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  • #2
Astronuc
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The beginning of the season should be the moment when the climatic conditions in the southern and northern hemispheres of the Planet Earth equalize.
The climatic conditions in the southern and northern hemispheres of the Planet Earth never equalize. They are always changing as the earth revolves around the sun. Two or four seasons is rather arbitrary, when climate and weather are continually changing. The closest one might come to equilibrium is near the equator +/- 15° latitude or around the equinox, but that is a regional/altitude/local effect.

If takes a look at different locations within the US over 1 year, one sees that temperature extremes and trends are vastly different. In the case of S. Hemisphere, the temperatures are 180° out of phase, but the extremes can be greater, since the earth is further from the sun during SH winter, and closer to the sun during SH summer.

Examples from 6 US locations, 3 in southern US and 3 in northern US, east to west.
 

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  • #3
The climatic conditions in the southern and northern hemispheres of the Planet Earth never equalize. They are always changing as the earth revolves around the sun. Two or four seasons is rather arbitrary, when climate and weather are continually changing. The closest one might come to equilibrium is near the equator +/- 15° latitude or around the equinox, but that is a regional/altitude/local effect.

If takes a look at different locations within the US over 1 year, one sees that temperature extremes and trends are vastly different. In the case of S. Hemisphere, the temperatures are 180° out of phase, but the extremes can be greater, since the earth is further from the sun during SH winter, and closer to the sun during SH summer.

Examples from 6 US locations, 3 in southern US and 3 in northern US, east to west.
Dear Astronuc,
All what you wrote is true.
That is why I wrote "calendar as a statistical model of some physical property of earth's upper air, independent from interacting factors such as topography, elevation, latitude, nearby water, ocean currents, vegetation and prevailing winds".
What do you think of this Article?
10 hPa Global Stratospheric Calendar at Stonehenge and Giza
 
  • #4
Astronuc
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Science Advisor
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Please provide/post an abstract and conclusions in this thread, and preferably, a brief description of the process/methodology. I don't generally use links to websites with which I am not familiar. To what journal(s) has the pre-print been submitted?

Off hand, I'm not sure what one can prove from two points both in the N. Hemisphere with considerably different environments.
Giza (near Cairo), 29.9870°N 31.2118°E
Stonehenge, Wiltshire, England, 51°10′44″N 1°49′34″W

Is one applying the model/methodology strictly to the stratosphere, or is one also considering the other regions: Mesosphere, Thermosphere and Exosphere?

How does one consider the troposphere, the lowest region of the atmosphere, extending from the earth's surface to a height of about 3.7–6.2 miles (6–10 km), which is the lower boundary of the stratosphere?
 
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