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IS IT POSSIBLE TO SOLVE FOR m2 from a(m1+m2) = (m2g-m1g)?

  1. Nov 24, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    a=(m2g-m1g)
    ------------- divided by IS IT POSSIBLE TO SOLVE FOR m2 =????
    (m1+m2) where g = gravity


    2. Relevant equations

    a(m1+m2) = (m2g-m1g)
    where g = gravity

    3. The attempt at a solution

    a(m1+m2) = (m2g-m1g)

    IS IT POSSIBLE TO SOLVE FOR m2 =???? where g = gravity

    THANKS!!!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 24, 2009 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    You can certainly isolate it on one side of the equation to get m2 = ___________

    Whether you can "solve" for it depends on if you have "a" and "m1" as knowns.
     
  4. Nov 24, 2009 #3
    lol..

    << most of solution deleted by berkeman >>

    This however looks completely ridiculous, what is it you are trying to solve??
     
  5. Nov 24, 2009 #4

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Please remember not to do the OP's homework for them. We can offer tutorial help, but do not work their equations for them. Thanks.
     
  6. Nov 24, 2009 #5
    Thanks! i just solved it myself lol. i got m2 = (-m1a-m1g)/(a-g) but i guess i will multyply by -1/-1 to make it (m1a+m1g)/g-a

    and im trying to solve an atwood machine problem. For example, 1 mass is given and the other is not given, and you know the acceleration so m2 = blabla really helps!!
     
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