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Is passion for classical physics enough to engineer?

  • Engineering
  • Thread starter annoyinggirl
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Let's say one has a passion for classical physics - he/she wants to learn all there is to learn about classical physics. Given that she/he has the intelligence and work ethic, does a passion for classical physics an indication enough that she/he should pursue engineering? Or could one love classical physics but dislike engineering? If so, why is that , since engineering is just the application of classical physics? What else could someone passionate about classical physics do besides engineering (that utilizes knowledge about classical physics).
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Stephen Tashi
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If so, why is that , since engineering is just the application of classical physics?
Engineering is not merely an application of classical physics. Things built in the real world must be constructed from available materials and parts. For example, mechanical engineer needs to know the available types of steel, sizes of bolts, types of gears etc. An engineer needs to know CAD/CAM software tools and how to write specifications.
 
  • #3
SteamKing
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Let's say one has a passion for classical physics - he/she wants to learn all there is to learn about classical physics. Given that she/he has the intelligence and work ethic, does a passion for classical physics an indication enough that she/he should pursue engineering? Or could one love classical physics but dislike engineering? If so, why is that , since engineering is just the application of classical physics? What else could someone passionate about classical physics do besides engineering (that utilizes knowledge about classical physics).
Not all types of engineering use physical principles equally. For example, an electrical engineer would deal more with electricity and electromagnetic waves, and less with water waves, or structures, for example. A structural engineer, of course, would deal quite a lot with structures, but not so much with atomic physics, or electricity, etc.

Unlike physics, a lot of engineering practice is codified in various regulations, standards, and other rules with which an engineer must be familiar.
 

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