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Is the product of P actually wug and what about

  1. May 4, 2012 #1
    P = mv so do this mean that the product of v is μg and the product of m is weight?

    So it could be written P = wμg

    How is this formula derived Vf = √(Vi^2 + (2ad))
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2012 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Hi Probie1! :smile:
    Sorry, I've no idea what you're talking about :redface:

    what is the context (and what do you mean by "product")? :confused:
     
  4. May 4, 2012 #3
    Does product not mean... umm the make up... it is part of or makes up?
    I guess the context of all this is I am trying to undertand how formula's come about.



    P = mv so do this mean that the product of v is μg and the product of m is weight?

    So it could be written P = wμg



    This is another question.

    How is this formula derived Vf = √(Vi^2 + (2ad))
     
  5. May 4, 2012 #4

    HallsofIvy

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    Mathematically "product" means the result of multiplying numbers. It simply doesn't make sense to talk about the "product" of a single number as in "product of v is μg" or "the product of m is weight". Perhaps you mean it the other way- weight is the product of mg. That is "mass times the acceleration due to gravity of an object is the force on that object due to gravity"- by definition its "weight". I'm not sure what you could mean by "v is the product μg", if that is what you intend, because you have not told us what μ is and it is not a standard symbol. Sometimes μ is used for the "coefficient of drag" but that doesn't make sense here. Assuming g is the acceleration due to gravity and v is velocity, their standard meanings, since v would have units of "meters per second" and g "meters per seconds squared", μ would have to have units of "seconds"- it would have to be a "time". Is that correct?
     
  6. May 4, 2012 #5

    Mark44

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    What other equations of motion do you know?
     
  7. May 5, 2012 #6

    tiny-tim

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    Hi Probie1! :smile:

    (try using the X2 and X2 buttons just above the Reply box :wink:)
    This is one of the standard equations for constant acceleration.

    So we start with a = constant.

    Then, integrating, v = at + vi.

    And integrating again, d = 1/2 at2 + vit.

    Can you finish the proof? :wink:

    As HallsofIvy says, no.

    What did you mean by P m v m and g ? :confused:
     
  8. May 5, 2012 #7

    D= at + vi2

    Alright... stop laughing.


    P = momentum
    m=mass
    v=velocity
    g = gravity
    μ = friction
    w= weight

    I thought that if P=mv then v = a = μg but then I remembered where I left my brain because a = change in velocity over a change in time. So it can't possibly be the way I was thinking. So just forget I was so stupid to write that down.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2012
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