Is there a relationship between the Higgs boson and gravity?

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Main Question or Discussion Point

I know that the Higgs boson gives particles their mass. I know that there are two kinds of mass: inertial mass and gravitational mass. I know that the Higgs boson gives the inertial mass, but is there a relationship between it and gravity? If so, what is that relationship? As far as I know, physicists are looking for gravitons to explain gravity.

If this question has been asked before, please give me the links, because I could not find them.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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The Higgs boson is responsible for ~1% of the mass of all everyday objects, the other 99% are binding energy. No, Higgs and gravity have no special relation.

See other threads for more details:
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=616906&highlight=Higgs+gravity
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=619402&highlight=Higgs+gravity
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=605260&highlight=Higgs+gravity
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=620970&highlight=Higgs+gravity
https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=620794&highlight=Higgs+gravity

https://www.physicsforums.com/search.php?f=65&query=higgs+gravity [Broken]
 
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  • #3
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The Higgs boson is responsible for ~1% of the mass of all everyday objects, the other 99% are binding energy. No, Higgs and gravity have no special relation.
What do you mean by 1% of the mass?
1% of the gravitational mass?
Does the Higgs boson exert gravity?
Isn't the Higgs boson responsible for all the inertial mass?
 
  • #4
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Xtyn said:
What do you mean by 1% of the mass?
Very few percent of the matter in the universe,is the matter we know,namely hadronic matter.I guess mfb means this
Xtyn said:
1% of the gravitational mass?
Gravitational and inertial mass are very very very near and in GR are considered to be equal
But here we mean inertial mass because SM excludes gravity
Xtyn said:
Does the Higgs boson exert gravity?
Higgs boson is massless
And SM excludes gravity
Xtyn said:
Isn't the Higgs boson responsible for all the inertial mass?
You mean the other 99%?
Higgs mechanism is explained to give W and Z bosons and fermions their mass
But those stuff are not made of fermions.
Also,those are the things that we don't completely know,and all theories explaining them,are not fully proved and accepted.
 
  • #5
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Very few percent of the matter in the universe,is the matter we know,namely hadronic matter.I guess mfb means this
No, I mean the composition of protons and neutrons: The quark masses account for ~1% of their mass, the other 99% is binding energy.
This is true both for inertial and gravitational mass, as they are equivalent (exact in general relativity, and no experiment found a deviation up to now).

Higgs boson is massless
This Higgs boson is not massless.
 
  • #6
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This Higgs boson is not massless.
Oohh...sorry...I just was studying about graviton and also I'm not very good now so I mixed them up otherwise how someone can forget about the mass range things in the possible higgs discovery news?!
 
  • #7
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No, I mean the composition of protons and neutrons: The quark masses account for ~1% of their mass, the other 99% is binding energy.
I see.
This is true both for inertial and gravitational mass, as they are equivalent (exact in general relativity, and no experiment found a deviation up to now).
If inertial and gravitational mass are equivalent, does this mean that increasing speed for a body also increases its gravitational mass? I know about the increase of inertial mass with speed, for a body, and I know about the time dilation and decreasing length, but I'm curious about mass.
 
  • #8
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If inertial and gravitational mass are equivalent, does this mean that increasing speed for a body also increases its gravitational mass? I know about the increase of inertial mass with speed, for a body, and I know about the time dilation and decreasing length, but I'm curious about mass.
The equivalence principle is part of GR not SR
In SR we're talking about flat space-time,which means space-time without gravity
So it only means inertial mass
The extension of SR for including gravity,is not as easy as answering the question that whether gravitational mass also increases or not!It needs sth as complicated as GR
Also the increase of mass in SR is so mysterious that I think physicists tend to avoid using it directly and use energy instead
 

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