Is There Evidence for the Existence of Torque in a Stationary System?

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In summary, the conversation discusses how to prove that in a stationary (non-rotating) system, the sum of the torque equals zero. The solution suggested is to use a evenly distributed meter stick on a fulcrum point and observe that when the stick is not rotating, the sum of the torques must be zero. To further demonstrate this, one can move the meter stick off balance and add weights to balance it out.
  • #1
Phil7860
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Okay, so the problem is pretty simple:

Prove that in a stationary (non-rotating) system, that the sum of the torque equals zero.

My solution is to take a meter stick that's mass is evenly distributed. Find the center of the meter stick, then balance it on a fulcrum point. Since the object is not rotating, the sum of the torques must equal zero.

Move the meter stick to the left or right, and the stick will rotate counter/clockwise.

My question is, would that convince you that the sum of the torque equals zero in a stationary system?
 
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  • #2
move it so it's off balance then put a light weight on the far, long end; and put a heavier weight on the shorter end wherever appropriate to make the thing balance.
 
  • #3


I would say that this experiment does provide evidence for the existence of torque in a stationary system. By balancing the meter stick on a fulcrum and observing its rotation when moved, we can see that there is a force acting on the object, causing it to rotate. This force is what we call torque.

Furthermore, this experiment follows the basic principles of torque - the force applied (moving the meter stick) is at a distance from the fulcrum (center of the meter stick), resulting in a rotational force. This shows that the sum of the torques must equal zero in a stationary system, as any imbalance in the forces would cause the object to rotate.

In addition, this experiment can be replicated and verified by other scientists, further supporting the existence of torque in a stationary system. Therefore, while this experiment may not be the only way to prove the existence of torque, it does provide strong evidence for its existence in a stationary system.
 

Related to Is There Evidence for the Existence of Torque in a Stationary System?

What is torque and how does it relate to physics?

Torque is a measure of the rotational force that causes an object to rotate around an axis. It is a fundamental concept in physics, as it describes the relationship between force and rotation.

How is torque measured?

Torque is measured using the equation τ = F x r, where τ is torque, F is force, and r is the distance from the axis of rotation to the point where the force is applied. It is typically measured in units of Newton-meters (Nm) or foot-pounds (ft-lb).

What is the significance of torque in real-world applications?

Torque is an important factor in many real-world applications, including engineering, mechanics, and sports. It is crucial in designing and building machines that require rotational motion, such as engines, turbines, and gears. In sports, torque is used to optimize performance and prevent injury in activities like golf swings and pitching in baseball.

How does torque differ from force?

While both torque and force involve the application of a physical force, they have different effects on an object. Force causes linear motion, while torque causes rotational motion. Additionally, torque takes into account the distance from the axis of rotation, while force does not.

How can you prove that torque exists?

Torque can be proven through various experiments and observations. One way is by using a torque meter, which measures the amount of torque applied to an object. Another way is by observing the rotational motion of objects, such as a spinning top or a bicycle wheel. Additionally, the concept of torque is supported by mathematical equations and is a fundamental principle in physics.

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