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Is there Gravity inside the human body?

  1. May 25, 2009 #1
    Is there Gravity inside the human body?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 25, 2009 #2
    Re: Gravity

    All matter has gravity. You have gravity just like a toothpick and the sun do. Your (and the toothpicks) gravity is very little though, so your effect on objects is extremely small compared to objects with more mass such as earth or the sun.
     
  4. May 25, 2009 #3
    Re: Gravity

    Thanks for d reply. I've got one more doubt. Wil d value of 'g' be 9.8m/s^2 inside d body too ?
     
  5. May 26, 2009 #4

    DaveC426913

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    Re: Gravity

    Things accelerate in Earth's gravity at 9.8m/s^2 if left to fall freely. If you swallowed a peanut whole, and it emerged from your esophagus to fall into your stomach, it would indeed fall at an accelerating rate of 9.8m/s^2.

    Why do you think it wouldn't?
     
  6. May 26, 2009 #5
    Re: Gravity

    THanks to who eva replied to my post :)
     
  7. May 26, 2009 #6
    Re: Gravity

    I'm just going to add a little since I'm worried you're misunderstanding DaveC.

    You can think of gravity as being like an effect. Anything that has mass (anything!) has it's own 'value' of gravity - the value of 'g' is dependent on the object. The bigger the mass of the object is, the bigger the value of 'g' - and since gravity is attractive, the more other objects will be attracted to it. Like Vorbis says, if you think about a toothpick floating around in space - it will have it's own value for 'g', just a very very small one. We don't notice things like this on Earth because the value 'g' Earth has is many, many times larger.

    Thus since your body has mass, it too has its own gravitational field - the only reason you don't notice is because you're so small in comparison to the Earth. Gravity is prevasive and for these purposes can be considered to 'go through' anything. Consider yourself falling through the sky. Now, before you activate your parachute(!), you already know that you'll be experiencing an acceleration of 9.8ms/2 - if gravity didn't affect all of your body at the same time, what would happen?

    If the outside of your body shielded the inside from gravitational effects then it would mean that your skin would be accelerating at 9.8ms/2 whilst, rather unfortunately, your internal organs would be at 0ms/2 - thinking about this will reveal the fact that it doesn't make sense. Where would your insides go? From common experience, they need to move at the same rate as the rest of your body.
     
  8. May 26, 2009 #7
    Re: Gravity

    According to Einstein, not only mass, all physical fields (energy) have gravity feature. Means, don't search gravity inside mass. It is a feature of energy.
     
  9. May 26, 2009 #8
    Re: Gravity

    One of d replies to my question said tat d food(peanut) wud reach d stomach wid a speed of 9.8m/s2. But, it has been experimentally proved tat even if v take in food, chew it n stand upside down, d food stil moves towards d stomach n dusnt come back. Y wd tat b? Is ther ny force opposin d gravitational force assumin there's gravity inside d body?
     
  10. May 26, 2009 #9

    DaveC426913

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    Re: Gravity

    It is very difficult to understand your typing. Is English not your first language?


    Your esophagus is lined with muscles that push food down to the stomach. At no time will food be in freefall in your esophagus. I was simplifying a scenario where, once the food exited the esophagus into your stomach, it would fall to the bottom of your stomach. (This is not strictly true either, since your stomach tends to expand and contract as it fills and empties, meaning it won't be a big hollow bag for the peanut to fall through.)

    All that aside, everywhere on the surface of the Earth, inside or outside objects, the force of gravity is felt. There are only three ways to remove this force:
    1] gain enough altitude that Earth's gravity is lessened by distance
    2] cancel the force with an opposing gravitational force in the opposite direction (move to the centre of the Earth or suspend an Earth-sized planet over your head).
    3] go into freefall (say by plunging in a fast elevator or by orbiting Earth).
     
  11. May 26, 2009 #10
    Re: Gravity

    Sorry for the language. I am quite used to the Internet chatting language. And thanks for your prompt reply
     
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