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Is this considered a 'pure math' major?

  1. Nov 16, 2013 #1
    Is it considered a 'pure' math major if classes like calc 1-3, diff eq, linear algebra, analysis, and discrete maths are a part of the major? If so, would an engineering or physics major be considered 'applied' mathematics?
     
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  3. Nov 16, 2013 #2

    Student100

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    I'm confused by what you mean, engineers and physics majors will take near all those classes.

    Some schools will offer different undergrad series for science majors and a proof heavy series for math majors.

    The classes that you list however, again, say nothing about the major.
     
  4. Nov 16, 2013 #3
  5. Nov 16, 2013 #4

    Student100

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    Kind of sucks you'd be doing GE your senior year, other then that you have what five technical electives, two upper division math electives, senior thesis. I'm not sure what math for citizenship is, but it's senior level. The school itself is a STEM focused public school that is accredited.

    I would say you'd probably be able to do "pure" math there, but it seems more focused on engineering and computation.

    I'm not a math major, so maybe some math majors would be able to help you out more. Call the school too.
     
  6. Nov 16, 2013 #5
    That looks like pure math, real analysis are proof heavy courses as is Intro to Alg. Structures, which looks like introduction to abstract algebra, the real difference however is what you choose for your electives.

    This http://techregistrar.wvutech.edu/r/download/132496 seems to describe the courses.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2013
  7. Nov 16, 2013 #6
    Thank you so much for finding that, MathWarrior! It is very helpful.
     
  8. Nov 16, 2013 #7

    AlephZero

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    I don't know what the state of math education in the US is like these days, but when I did a math degree in the UK, we had the equivalent of those M341, 451 and 452 courses starting on the first day of year one.
     
  9. Nov 17, 2013 #8

    Student100

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    You also went to Cambridge and probably had a thorough calculus foundation in high school. I don't know what they teach at that level in the US anymore, but they generally just require two semesters of elementary algebra. If they do offer AP calculus classes its mostly just a crash course in calculus one, I didn't have that option at my school at all.

    Again I've been out of highschool for a while, but it's pretty typical to do the calculus series freshman year of college.

    We never did any proof math, or trig even in HS. It may have been the same for you and Cambridge just throws you into the deep end of the pool, but I don't know the UK system at all either.
     
  10. Nov 17, 2013 #9

    WannabeNewton

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    AP Calc BC covers calc 1 and calc 2. My high school, amongst many others in the US, also offered calc 3, ODEs, and LA.

    This is true but it is also up to the student to decide how rigorous a calculus class he/she wants to take. Proof based freshman honors calculus courses are offered by many universities in the US and these are basically stepping stones into real analysis. Schools like UChicago also actively allow students to take honors real analysis their first year.
     
  11. Nov 17, 2013 #10

    Student100

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    Interesting, so it isn't like I had imagined were everything that is taught in highschool is only what's relevant for standardization exams.

    I went to a rural school, with 45 graduating seniors my final year. This probably also played a major role in what was available.


    This is relevant and useful for the OP in deciding where they should study.
    To the OP: was WVU your number one option, If so why?
     
  12. Nov 17, 2013 #11

    WannabeNewton

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    I would be lying if I said most of it isn't taught like that though :)

    I would imagine that had major influence. I went to a relatively big science based school (~700 kids in my graduating year).
     
  13. Nov 17, 2013 #12
    Yes it was my number one option. It is in state (lower tuition), a small school (1000-1500), and WV high school students with an overall 3.0 gpa by the end of their senior year get Promise Scholarship ($4700 per year for 4 years). I wanted a small school because it is what I am used to. Also, the college classes that I am taking right now and next semester (Calc 1 and 2, College English 1 and 2, Psych, and Euro History) transfer because they are taught by a local college that is part of WVU.
     
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