Is wave-particle duality a result of the relativity theory?

In summary, the conversation discusses the idea that wave-particle duality is a result of relativity theory and the role of measurement in determining the properties of quantum objects. There is also a mention of quantum mechanics and relativity as mathematical frameworks for describing the physical world, as well as the possibility of a unified theory of everything.
  • #1
Have thought about this for sometime but couldn't get deeper.
I have speculated that wave-particle duality is a direct result of the relativity theory. Especially it could arise from the factor of length contraction (dimensionality reduction). So far, the particle reality is based on various high speed collision experiments. When high speed waves collide into each other or something, the action may reveal extra hidden small dimension or result in diminishing of some dimensions.
Hope someone if have the same idea can work out a math for this...
 
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  • #2
Jianping Zhang said:
I have speculated that wave-particle duality is a direct result of the relativity theory.

Wave-particle duality is an outadeted concept that belongs to so called 'old quantum theory' which died around 1924-1926. There is no duality in modern quantum physics. Use 'search' button, there have been plenty discussions about that issue.
 
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  • #3
weirdoguy said:
Wave-particle duality is an outadeted concept that belongs to so called 'old quantum theory' which died around 1924-1926. There is no duality in modern quantum physics. Use 'search' button, there have been plenty discussions about that issue.
Thanks Weridoguy for the reply. I guess people have no further understanding other than to accept that these are quantum objects describing by quantum theory. Quote "These quantum objects exhibit wave-like properties if you measure for wave like properties and they exhibit particle-like properties if you measure for particle-like properties, but neither of those facts makes them a wave or a particle, they are just quantum objects."
Here the thing is about "measure". Measuring a high-speed quantum objects looks very much like to do a collision experiment. That's why I am thinking of Relativity's role in quantum objects. And intend to believe a quantum object is only a "quantum wave", not a quantum particle.
 
  • #4
Jianping Zhang said:
... a quantum object is only a "quantum wave", not a quantum particle.
You're just playing games with words. A quantum object is a quantum object.
 
  • #5
Jianping Zhang said:
Quote "These quantum objects exhibit wave-like properties if you measure for wave like properties and they exhibit particle-like properties if you measure for particle-like properties, but neither of those facts makes them a wave or a particle, they are just quantum objects."

Where are you quoting this from? You need to give specific references.

Jianping Zhang said:
Measuring a high-speed quantum objects looks very much like to do a collision experiment.

That's one way of measuring, yes. But it's certainly not the only one.

Jianping Zhang said:
That's why I am thinking of Relativity's role in quantum objects.

Quantum field theory combines special relativity with quantum mechanics.
 
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  • #6
PeterDonis said:
Where are you quoting this from? You need to give specific references.
That's one way of measuring, yes. But it's certainly not the only one.
Quantum field theory combines special relativity with quantum mechanics.
Sorry, quoted from one of Phinds' post.
Can people believe that QT is not a physical theory rather than a mathematical frame? The real physics here lying behind is Relativity?
 
  • #7
Jianping Zhang said:
Can people believe that QT is not a physical theory rather than a mathematical frame? The real physics here lying behind is Relativity?

I don't understand what you think the difference is between a "physical theory" and a "mathematical frame". Both quantum mechanics and relativity make predictions that can be compared with experiments.
 
  • #8
There is nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and there is relativistic quantum mechanics. The latter is more accurate and quantum field theory is fully relativistic. The categories you ask about don't exist.
 
  • #9
Jianping Zhang said:
Sorry, quoted from one of Phinds' post.
Can people believe that QT is not a physical theory rather than a mathematical frame? The real physics here lying behind is Relativity?
Relativity provides the space-time model that is most succuessful in formulating all of physics. The most comprehensive space-time model we have today is general relativity, closely related with gravity, but there's a problem with a fully satisfactorial quantum theoretical formulation of gravitation. Fortunately gravitation is so weak that it can be neglected in many circumstances.

Thus one describes space-time by special relativity (Einstein-Minkowski space) and matter and its interactions with relativistic quantum field theory. This makes up the Standard Model of elementary particles physics, which describes all known matter and the electromagnetic, strong, and weak interactions (where the electromagnetic and the weak interaction is combined into the electroweak interaction). The first step in systematically building this theory is a careful analysis of the symmetries of the space-time model, leading to the notion of mass and spin as the basic properties of any quantum system. The gauge symmetries underlying the description of the interactions further lead to several conserved charges (electric charge, weak isospin, and color charges).

It may well be that with a complete theory of everything, which must include (at least!) gravity, that there's no more separate space-time concept left but everything is in some way combined to one quantum-theoretical framework, but that's speculation since there's not yet any really convincing answer to this most challenging enigma of contemporary physics.
 
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1. What is wave-particle duality?

Wave-particle duality is a concept in physics that describes how particles, such as electrons and photons, can exhibit both wave-like and particle-like behavior. This means that these particles can have characteristics of both waves, such as interference and diffraction, and particles, such as mass and momentum.

2. How does the theory of relativity relate to wave-particle duality?

The theory of relativity, specifically the special theory of relativity, played a crucial role in the development of wave-particle duality. It was first proposed by Albert Einstein in 1905, and it showed that the laws of physics are the same for all observers moving at a constant velocity. This idea challenged the previously accepted notion of absolute space and time, and it paved the way for understanding the wave-like and particle-like nature of matter.

3. Is the theory of relativity necessary to explain wave-particle duality?

While the theory of relativity is not the only explanation for wave-particle duality, it has been instrumental in helping us understand this concept. The theory provides a mathematical framework for describing the behavior of particles at high speeds, which is essential for understanding the wave-like and particle-like properties of matter.

4. Can wave-particle duality be observed in real-life situations?

Yes, wave-particle duality has been observed in many experiments and real-life situations. For example, the double-slit experiment, where particles behave like waves and create an interference pattern, is a classic demonstration of wave-particle duality. Other experiments, such as the photoelectric effect, also provide evidence for this phenomenon.

5. How does wave-particle duality impact our understanding of the universe?

The concept of wave-particle duality has greatly influenced our understanding of the universe and the fundamental nature of matter. It has led to the development of quantum mechanics, which is essential for explaining the behavior of particles at the microscopic level. This understanding has also led to advancements in technology, such as transistors and lasers, which have numerous applications in our daily lives.

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