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Programs Joint Degree in Computer Science and Physics.

  1. Aug 14, 2016 #1
    Hello,I just graduated from high school and i will be starting university in fall 2016 at the University of Manitoba in Canada. They have a joint degree program in physics and computer science which is a program I'm considering since, I enjoy studying about both disciplines. I would like your feedback on whether the program contains the core courses required for a good undergraduate education in physics or would i be missing out and would be better off majoring in physics alone. I have attached a screen shot of the program requirements http://imgur.com/wZIYKSD and http://imgur.com/c9bcezK and also the other courses offered at the university http://imgur.com/RRdeouW.
    Any suggestions would be highly appreciated. Thanks. Have a great day.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 14, 2016 #2

    Student100

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    The highest math they require of you is calculus 2? That's a bit strange, and raises red flags. What school is this?
     
  4. Aug 14, 2016 #3
    I apologise for not clarrifying this, the theoretical physics 1 and 2 courses cover all the mathematics required. The name of the school is University of Manitoba.
     
  5. Aug 14, 2016 #4

    Student100

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    I see, after looking at the physics department information on their website, I would be highly skeptical of this school - were I you. The topics covered in the TP 1 and 2 seem okay. If you choose the right electives in your 4th year you could hit what any physics major would probably cover in their undergraduate.

    However, the fact they don't just offer a general physics degree seems odd to me. Some of the courses left off the required list you posted is also strange. Some of the course descriptions make me believe they aren't going to cover things you should cover in them.

    Not from Canada, so if this is normal for your country, then ignore it.
     
  6. Aug 14, 2016 #5
    I'm sorry I don't understand, so are you recommending for or against the program?
     
  7. Aug 14, 2016 #6

    Student100

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    I don't know Canada well enough to know if this is normal or not, I just recommend proceeding with caution.

    If you do the program, make sure you take extra electives in both CM and EM.
     
  8. Aug 14, 2016 #7
    Yes, i would be taking Quantam mechanics 3,classical mechanics 2 and 3, Electromagnetic magnetostatic theory and one course in general relativity or maybe another advanced course in EM. How do you see?
     
  9. Aug 14, 2016 #8

    Student100

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    Should be fine, I would do the third course in EM rather than GR to be honest.
     
  10. Aug 14, 2016 #9
    Thank you , i will definitely do that then. So would it be alright to not do a thesis in my last year and rather do courses since it is not required for admission to grad school ?
     
  11. Aug 14, 2016 #10

    Student100

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    Wouldn't affect you in the US, I don't know about Canada however. Make sure you volunteer for undergraduate research.
     
  12. Aug 14, 2016 #11
    Ok.Thank you, for the taking the time to answer my questions.
     
  13. Aug 15, 2016 #12

    StatGuy2000

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    To the OP:

    I am from Canada (U of T graduate), and I have looked at the requirements of your program at U of Manitoba. I've known a few people who have graduated from that school and have heard that it is a good school (although not in the specific joint honours program in physics and computer science). However, when I looked at the requirements of the joint honours program, I was surprised that I didn't see any requirements for differential equations or complex analysis (the double major in CS and physics or the former joint specialist program at U of T required both). Differential equations and complex analysis are important in later physics courses, so you may want to ask the department more about this.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2016
  14. Aug 15, 2016 #13
    Please have a look at the theoretical physics 1 and 2 course descriptions http://imgur.com/a/8x8xD. Would that cover the mathematics required?
    Thanks.
     
  15. Aug 15, 2016 #14

    StatGuy2000

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    I've read the course description and it looks like theoretical physics 2 offered covers differential equations, as well as topics such as Fourier series, transforms methods which are topics typically covered in real and complex analysis. So it appears that at U of Manitoba, these are essentially the equivalent of the "mathematical methods" courses offered to physics students in many universities in the US. At U of T, there are no real equivalents for such courses, so physics students take differential equations and analysis courses offered in the math department.

    From what I can see, the required mathematics required for physics students are covered in those 2 courses, so you should be OK.
     
  16. Aug 15, 2016 #15
    So would you recommend the program?
     
  17. Aug 15, 2016 #16

    StatGuy2000

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    I think it looks like a solid program from what I can tell. Again, U of Manitoba is a good school (to be honest, at the undergraduate level in Canada, it doesn't really matter all that much what school you graduate from).
     
  18. Aug 15, 2016 #17
    Thank you for the taking the time to answer my questions.
     
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