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Homework Help: Kinematics - Statics - Free Body Diagram

  1. Jan 13, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    https://online-s.physics.uiuc.edu/cgi/courses/shell/common/showme.pl?courses/phys211/spring09/homework/11/two-beams/fig3a.gif [Broken]
    Two identical uniform beams, each of mass "M" and length "L", are symmetrically set up against each other on a floor with which they have a coefficient of static friction "u". The acceleration due to gravity is "g".

    Find the minimum angle θmin that the beams can make with the floor without falling.

    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution

    When drawing a Free Body Diagram, i figured out at the center of mass in each rod and the surface between rod and the ground..

    But i am confused with the surface between rods.

    Is there gonna be only horizontal force(pushing each other) or since they are inclined, there should be both horizontal and vertical forces?

    Really confusing...

    Could someone help me out here?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 13, 2010 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Hi nahanksh! :smile:

    From symmetry, the vertical components of force between the beams must be equal.

    But good ol' Newton's third law says that the forces of each beam on the other must be equal and opposite.

    So the vertical components must be zero. :wink:
     
  4. Jan 13, 2010 #3
    Thanks for your reply.

    Then there is no horizontal forces between the beams ?
     
  5. Jan 13, 2010 #4

    tiny-tim

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    From symmetry, the horizontal components of force between the beams must be equal and opposite.

    Newton's third law agrees … the forces of each beam on the other must be equal and opposite.

    So the horizontal components don't have to be zero! :smile:
     
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