Kinetic Engergy in a Quantum Oscillator

In summary, the conversation discusses the calculation of the kinetic energy required for an electron beam to excite a quantum oscillator from its ground state to two levels above. The mass and spring stiffness values are provided, but the formula for calculating the kinetic energy is not clear. The answer is given as 6.8e-2 J, but the process of reaching this answer is not fully understood.
  • #1
cowmoo32
122
0
How much kinetic engergy in eV must an election beam have to be able to excite a quantum oscillator from its ground state to two levels above the ground state if the mass is 3e-26kg and the spring stiffness is 80N/m?

All I can find is the spacing between the energy levels, I have no idea how to find K. The answer is 6.8e-2 J, but I don't have a clue how to get there.
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I can only assume that you can convert whatever energy (number) you got to kiloelectronvolts.

Daniel.
 
  • #3
I got 2.8e61 using the forumla DeltaE = hbar*sqrt(Ks/m)
but this is the space between engergy levels. I don't know how to calculate the kinetic energy of the electron beam.
 
  • #4
my book has the forumla K + U = (.5p^2/m) + .5Ks^2+U0
but I'm not sure what K would be equal to. Granted, it's obvious it would be (.5p^2/m) + .5Ks^2+U0-U but I don't know U either.
 
  • #5
It means that you don't understand the question: the electron beam's energy is at least equal to the energy the quantum oscillator gets in order to jump from the fundamental level to the second excited one. For simplicity, take it as equal.

Daniel.
 
  • #6
Ok, the beam has to have as much energy as it takes for the electron to move from one energy level to the next, I understand that. But I still don't understand how to arrive at the answer. The answer I got is nowhere near the correct answer.
 
  • #7
Maybe it's a number/conversion problem. I'm n ot going to show such trivial computation and maybe no one will.

Daniel.
 

Related to Kinetic Engergy in a Quantum Oscillator

1. What is kinetic energy in a quantum oscillator?

Kinetic energy in a quantum oscillator refers to the energy that is associated with the movement or motion of particles within a quantum mechanical system. It is a form of energy that is commonly observed in subatomic particles and can be described using mathematical equations such as the Schrödinger equation.

2. How is kinetic energy in a quantum oscillator different from classical kinetic energy?

Unlike classical kinetic energy, which is described as the energy of an object in motion, kinetic energy in a quantum oscillator is more complex and is influenced by the laws of quantum mechanics. It is also quantized, meaning it can only exist in certain discrete energy levels, unlike classical kinetic energy which can take on any value.

3. What is the relationship between kinetic energy and potential energy in a quantum oscillator?

In a quantum oscillator, kinetic energy and potential energy are two forms of energy that constantly exchange and are connected through the Schrödinger equation. As the particle moves, its kinetic energy increases while its potential energy decreases, and vice versa.

4. How is kinetic energy in a quantum oscillator measured?

Kinetic energy in a quantum oscillator is measured using various experimental techniques such as spectroscopy and scattering experiments. These methods allow scientists to observe the behavior and properties of particles within a quantum mechanical system and calculate their kinetic energy.

5. Can kinetic energy in a quantum oscillator be manipulated?

Yes, kinetic energy in a quantum oscillator can be manipulated through various methods such as changing the external conditions of the system or applying external forces. Scientists can also control the energy levels of particles within a quantum mechanical system, thereby indirectly manipulating their kinetic energy.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
13
Views
683
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
208
Replies
0
Views
263
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
816
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
18
Views
2K
Back
Top