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Kinetic/Mechanical Energy -> Electricity?

  1. Dec 18, 2009 #1
    Kinetic/Mechanical Energy ----> Electricity?

    Hi,

    I am new to these forums (always the cliche phrase of a new person!:tongue:), and i was wondering about a certain question. What are the most efficient mechanisms of converting kinetic or mechanical energy into electricity? I tried to do some stuff on google for about 2 hours, but i did not find any ways of how a device converts the energy. All i found were articles about such devices.

    Also, I'm not sure whether this is the appropriate forum to ask this question, so I am also going to post in the Engineering Forums.

    Thanks!

    -rtsphysics
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 18, 2009 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    Re: Kinetic/Mechanical Energy ----> Electricity?

    Are you taking hydropower, like a Niagara falls generating station which relies on the potential to kinetic energy change of the the falling waters of the Niagara River to spin a turbine connected by a shaft to a generator, where the spinning magnets rotating past copper coils produces electricity??. Cheap and reliable power.
     
  4. Dec 18, 2009 #3
    Re: Kinetic/Mechanical Energy ----> Electricity?

    Oops! I just realized I didn't make myself clear...Sorry!

    Well, I was thinking along the lines of biomechanical engineering, maybe harvesting energy from walking. So in that perspective, it's more like harvesting the kinetic energy and mechanical energy from walking or any other type of movement into electricity.
     
  5. Dec 18, 2009 #4

    PhanthomJay

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    Re: Kinetic/Mechanical Energy ----> Electricity?

    Oh sure go to your nearest science museum and they'll probably have a bike you can pedal that's connected to a small generator that lights up a 100 watt bulb. Same principle, except pedal power replaces water power. Pretty tiring and inefficient though, I'd let the water do the work for me.:wink:
     
  6. Dec 18, 2009 #5

    rock.freak667

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    Re: Kinetic/Mechanical Energy ----> Electricity?

    I believe the rankine cycle and brayton cycle works like that. Steam/air causes a turbine to spin which cuts a magnetic field and induces an output emf.


    EDIT: Sorry, I now read the other posts, ^^ that was not what you wanted to know. Sorry.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2009
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