Kinetic & Potential Energy of 0° Ice/Water: Examined

In summary, The kinetic and potential energy of molecules changes when they go from a liquid to a solid, but the mean kinetic energy of a solid and liquid of the same material and mass is constant in temperature.
  • #1
titansarus
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Hi.
In all of my question, I mean degrees celsius when I say degree.
Think we have a 0 degree ice. we give some energy to it (by a heater) and all of it get into a 0 degree water.
How does the kinetic and potential energy of the molecules change?

In the book in which I saw this question, it said that potential energy increases and kinetic energy of molecules doesn't change because of K= 3/2 k T. My problem is that we use K = 3/2 k T in ideal gases. is it valid for liquids or solids? Is it right to say that the mean kinetic energy of a solid and a liquid (of the same material and the same mass) is constant in temperature Θ? It doesn't seem logical. If it is true, how the water is more fluid and free than a solid?

Whatever the answer is, is it same for liquid and gas?

Sorry for my English.
 
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  • #2
Hello titan, :welcome:

titansarus said:
we use K = 3/2 k T in ideal gases
meaning gases of infinitely small hard spheres that stilll can collide (I realize this is contradictory). So not for liquids and not for solids.
 
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  • #3
BvU said:
Hello titan, :welcome:

meaning gases of infinitely small hard spheres that stilll can collide (I realize this is contradictory). So not for liquids and not for solids.
So, This means that if we have a liquid and a solid of the same temperature, we can't say their molecules (or particles) have the same kinetic energy. and the liquid particles has more kinetic energy than the solid of the same temperature, Is this right?
 
  • #4
Good question. The constituents (ions, atoms, molecules) of a solid can't wander about, but they can vibrate about an average position. The energies associated with those degrees of freedom are generally less than the energy these constituents have when in the liquid state -- hence the latent heat of melting.

Perhaps you notice I'm treading carefully here -- some expert input would be welcome
 
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Related to Kinetic & Potential Energy of 0° Ice/Water: Examined

What is kinetic energy?

Kinetic energy is the energy an object possesses due to its motion. It is defined as one-half of the mass of an object multiplied by the square of its velocity.

What is potential energy?

Potential energy is the energy an object possesses due to its position or condition. It is stored energy that can be converted into kinetic energy.

How does 0° ice/water exhibit kinetic and potential energy?

At 0°, ice and water molecules are in a state of equilibrium, meaning they have the same amount of kinetic and potential energy. The molecules are moving, exhibiting kinetic energy, while also being held together by intermolecular forces, exhibiting potential energy.

What happens to the kinetic and potential energy of 0° ice/water when heat is applied?

When heat is applied, the temperature of the ice/water increases, causing the molecules to move faster and increasing their kinetic energy. This increase in kinetic energy also breaks the intermolecular forces, decreasing the potential energy of the molecules.

Why is the study of kinetic and potential energy important?

Understanding kinetic and potential energy is crucial in various fields such as physics, chemistry, and engineering. It helps us explain and predict the behavior of matter and energy in different systems and processes, leading to advancements in technology and innovations in various industries.

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