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Level of thermodynamics does an engineer needs to know

  1. Nov 28, 2005 #1

    Lisa!

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    What level of thermodynamics does an engineer(with Bachelor degree) need to know? And I'd be grateful if someone tells me what book engineering students study for their thermodynamics course?(especially nuclear eng., mechanical eng. or chemical eng.)

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 28, 2005 #2

    brewnog

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    I used 'Engineering Thermodynamics, Work & Heat Transfer' by Rogers & Mayhew (Prentice Hall) for my degree (mech eng), was pretty much a bible, and I still occasionally refer to it.
     
  4. Nov 28, 2005 #3

    TD

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    We use MIT's "Physical Chemistry" (Silbey, Alberty & Bawendi). Part 1 (out of 4) is on Thermodynamics.
     
  5. Nov 28, 2005 #4

    brewnog

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    Is this not more chemical thermodynamics rather than engineering thermodynamics?
     
  6. Nov 28, 2005 #5

    russ_watters

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    It depends on the type of engineer. If mechanical or aerospace, a lot. Thermodynamics is a fundamental part of those two disciplines.
     
  7. Nov 28, 2005 #6

    TD

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    This is a thermodynamics course all the engineering students get in the second bachelor year, at our university. Choosing your specialty is done in the 3rd year here and if you choose chemical engineering, you'll get more in the higher years - and I suppose also more engineering-oriented.
     
  8. Nov 28, 2005 #7

    Astronuc

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    Mechanical, aerospace and nuclear engineers probably need the most thermodynamics background, and I expect chemical engineers as well. Within these discplines, besides the basic laws of thermodynamics, one needs to delve into details of thermodynamic cycles, and one would likely specialize in one particular cycle, e.g. Rankine (steam/water), Brayton, Stirling, Carnot, etc. A lot depends on the working fluid and thermodynamic conditions, and whether combustion is inolved or not. Looking at jet or rocket propulsion, particularly with supersonic flow is another level of complexity.

    And then there is thermal-hydraulics (coupling of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics).
     
  9. Nov 29, 2005 #8

    Lisa!

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    Thanks everyone! :smile:
     
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