Limit problem involving 1-sided limits

  • Thread starter Bipolarity
  • Start date
  • #1
775
1

Homework Statement


[tex] \lim_{a→0+}\frac{1}{a}- \lim_{b→0-}\frac{1}{b} [/tex]


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


I assume I would have to use the Cauchy definition of a limit to solve this, but I was wondering if there were any alternative ways.

BiP
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
You cannot solve this at all, because neither of the two limits exist. Thus you cannot carry out the substraction.
 
  • #3
54
0
hmm personally I would say the first term gives +infinity and the second term gives - infinite; so subtracting the two would give +infinity. why is this wrong?
 
  • #4
Damn, I guess you're right ;-)
 

Related Threads on Limit problem involving 1-sided limits

  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
952
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
2K
Top