Links between Everett, Feynman, Kripke?

In summary, the conversation discusses the similarities and differences between Feynman's summation over histories and Everett's MWI in addressing different problems in quantum physics. Additionally, the possibility of using Kripke frames or linear logic to further understand quantum mechanics is mentioned. However, it is unclear if this has been pursued.
  • #1
nomadreid
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As I state my questions, there are likely to be errors that I would appreciate being corrected. Beyond that, however, if the gist of the questions can be salvaged after correcting these errors, I would also like answers to your version of the questions.
Both Feynman's summation over histories and Everett's MWI start off from the collection of possible events at any given moment. From there Feynman keeps them all in one universe and performs path integrals, while Everett has each path lead an independent existence in its own universe. Nonetheless, there is the gut feeling that the two have probably been unified somewhere. If so, could someone outline how or give me a link (that doesn't lead to a to-be-paid-for article)?
Secondly, in mathematical logic, the theory of Kripke frames is sometimes called many worlds, and one can see a superficial resemblance to the states of quantum physics, but has this ever been pursued?
 
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  • #2
The relation between Feynman and Everett is only superficial. They address completely different problems. While Feynman gives a mathematical method to calculate the wave function and this method is completely equivalent to the Schrodinger equation, Everett attempts to solve the measurement problem, i.e., to give a physical meaning to the wave function without introducing the wave-function collapse.
 
  • #3
nomadreid said:
Secondly, in mathematical logic, the theory of Kripke frames is sometimes called many worlds, and one can see a superficial resemblance to the states of quantum physics, but has this ever been pursued?
People have looked at something called "quantum logic" -- but my vague not-a-physicist impression is that you can do the same thing better with C*-algebra.

John Baez briefly mentions "linear logic" being applied to quantum mechanics. I'm not sure if this application is really different than quantum logic.


I'm really only familiar with Kripke through Kripke-Joyal semantics which relates to intuitionistic logic -- I can't say if it bears any relevance to what I mentioned above. But Stanford's page on linear logic does mention Kripke models.
 

Related to Links between Everett, Feynman, Kripke?

What is the link between Everett, Feynman, and Kripke?

The link between these three individuals is their contributions to the fields of physics and philosophy. Hugh Everett III proposed the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, Richard Feynman made significant contributions to quantum electrodynamics, and Saul Kripke is known for his work in logic and philosophy of language.

What is the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics?

The many-worlds interpretation is a theory that suggests that every possible outcome of a quantum event actually occurs in a separate universe. This interpretation was first proposed by Hugh Everett III in the 1950s.

What are Richard Feynman's contributions to physics?

Richard Feynman is most well-known for his work in quantum electrodynamics, which is the study of the interactions between electrically charged particles. He also made significant contributions to the fields of particle physics, superfluidity, and quantum computing.

Who is Saul Kripke and what is his significance?

Saul Kripke is an American philosopher known for his work in logic, language, and metaphysics. He is best known for his theory of rigid designators, which has had a significant impact on the study of language and reference.

How do the ideas of these three individuals intersect?

The ideas of Everett, Feynman, and Kripke intersect in their exploration of the nature of reality, particularly in terms of quantum mechanics and the implications of multiple universes. They also all made significant contributions to their respective fields, influencing the study of physics and philosophy.

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