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Local dialect you never knew was local.

  1. Nov 21, 2006 #1

    matthyaouw

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    Has anyone heard the word "Tret/treat"? (Not sure how it's supposed to be spelled.)
    It's used interchangably with treated, and pronounced to rhyme with 'bet'. Its a word I've always been familiar with, but was recently told that once you get more than a few miles outside of Hull no one knows what you're talking about. Its funny how you can grop up with something not realising just how localised it might be.
    Also, no one outside of Hull knows what a breadcake is (a bread roll), or a tenfoot, for that matter (an alley about 10 feet wide behind a terrace of houses, built for car access).

    Anyone else strayed far from home and suddenly realised no one knows what half of your vocabulary means?
     
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  3. Nov 21, 2006 #2

    Evo

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    Unfortunately growing up in a large city in the US, there was no local vocabulary, although my mom was great at making up words, a tradition I have carried on, much to the distress of my girls when they found out that some of the words in their vocabulary didn't exist in the real world. :redface:
     
  4. Nov 21, 2006 #3

    D H

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    IMHO, large eastern US cities are full of local dialect. For example, I find people with a thick Boston accent to be quite hard to understand. Both the word pronunciation and word choice are quite different from typical American English.

    Another example: When New Yorkers leave their city, they need to learn that f*** is not a good word to inject into every other sentence.
     
  5. Nov 21, 2006 #4

    Ivan Seeking

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    We had surfer and gang lingo in Los Angeles.

    In the Midwest there is a funny word used to describe the action of thawing frozen food - to de-thaw - that really would imply just the opposite of "thaw". It seems that this may be a remnant of the German "be", as in "bethaw", rather than to "dethaw". Our Dutch mentor Monique once observed that as a function of a German dialect, this might make sense. The Midwest US has many people of German descent.

    So much of this sort of thing could be and probably is cultural/ethnic.

    There is an area in South Dakota where people used to drink their coffee with a cube of sugar held between their teeth. This was a Finnish custom, and of course the area was all Finn.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2006
  6. Nov 21, 2006 #5

    Math Is Hard

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    Yankees hardly ever understand what I mean when I say I'm fixin' do to something.
     
  7. Nov 21, 2006 #6
    Visitors say mary-land.

    We just say marrylan. No d sound.
     
  8. Nov 21, 2006 #7

    Moonbear

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    I say more like mer-i-land.

    When saying "drawer," I pronounce it "draw." It's a NJ thing. It's one of the few words that are distinctly different from the way anyone else around here pronounces it...and I know because the folks in the lab are merciless about laughing over my pronunciation of that word. They say they usually can't recognize any particular accent of mine until I say that word. :rolleyes:

    Oh, and I noticed a regional WV thing is to pronounce every letter in the word vehicle...they say it vee-hick'-el....accent on the middle syllable too. Most places people pronounce it with a silent H and accent on the first syllable, vee'-i-kul.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2006
  9. Nov 21, 2006 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    Another midwest diddy: They worsh their clothes.
     
  10. Nov 21, 2006 #9
    That's nothing. I'm from one of those densely populated European regions. We have villages here where half of the locals can't understand each other for crying out loud... I'm still convinced that the dialects of West-Flanders aren't Indo-european :biggrin:

    Sounds like Dutch-speaking influence to me...that's how we pronounce it.
     
  11. Nov 21, 2006 #10
    Umm, I dont think so :uhh:
     
  12. Nov 23, 2006 #11

    brewnog

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    Matthyizzaow! Long time no smell.

    I have indeed heard "tret" before, mainly in Yorkshire hospitals!

    You'll love this link of an NHS document designed for healthcare professionals coming from overseas to help them understand what folk in Doncaster are on about!

    http://www.doncasterwestpct.nhs.uk/uploads/reports/GlossaryforInternationalRecruits.pdf


    And people look at me weird when I speak of breadcakes, but not as weird as the guys in Hull who call them 'fadges'!
     
  13. Nov 23, 2006 #12

    Hurkyl

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    I didn't realize "gawker delays" (you know, when traffic slows down because everyone's gawking at the accident on the side of the road) was regional until I moved away from Michigan.
     
  14. Nov 23, 2006 #13

    Evo

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    :rofl: I worked with a girl that spoke that way, and she pronounced "data" as "dater".
     
  15. Nov 23, 2006 #14
    Hmm..... For some good examples of slang used in the south, watch Blue Collared TV.

    for exampe: European

    Euro-Pean on my boots.
     
  16. Nov 24, 2006 #15

    brewnog

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    Seems perfectly normal to me!
     
  17. Nov 24, 2006 #16
    As a Grimsby lad, I also say 'tret'. I've never thought about whether or not it's the standardised past conjugation of 'to treat', but now you've brought it up, it's quite interesting for a few reasons...

    'Unofficial' or colloquial verb conjugations tend to gravitate toward regularity, e.g. 'catched' (colloquial) instead of 'caught' (standardised). So it's pretty weird that in North East England (and likely some other places), the past conjugation for 'to treat' veered toward irregularity. Maybe that's symptomatic of the verb 'to treat' being quite old. But I'm not very knowledgeable on the subject. Still, it's interesting to think about it :).

    Do you have the verb 'to deff out' in Hull? It's synonymous with 'to worry', 'to fret' and 'to fear', but suggests that the person in the process of 'deffing out' is exhibiting physical symptoms of anxiety, such as perspiration and paling of the skin. It's associated with drug culture, e.g. somebody who starts to feel either anxious or physically sick during a Marijuana high is said to be 'deffing out'. 'To deff' (without the word 'out') tends to mean to vomit, especially while intoxicated, but can also mean 'to worry'.

    It's funny about the word 'out' in the verb 'to deff out'. This is a particularly English peculiarity, which apparently poses some problems to ESOL students. Some examples: "to nip out", "to pop out", e.g. "I'm just popping out to town", meaning "I'm going to the town centre".

    Could any Americans tell me if verbs with 'out' in them are used in America? Afaik, 'to pop out' is pretty universal to UK, as I've heard Londoners as well as Northerners use it. But I've never heard an American say it.
     
  18. Nov 25, 2006 #17

    matthyaouw

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    I've been without t'internet at home for a few months, so mainly been lurking when i pop on here. Think I've read that list before.its classic :rofl:

    Even I've not heard that one...

    I've heard it, but not very often, and I didn't really know what it meant. Come to think of it, it might just be my housemate from Immingham that says it. Maybe its just a south of the river thing. By the way, do you guys have tenfoots over there or is it just Hull?
     
  19. Nov 25, 2006 #18
    LOL

    Dutch has a lot of influence on anglo-saxon languages. Scots (Low lands Language of scotland), sometimes is more like Dutch than English. Its nearest relation (after English) is friesian.

    In Glasgow you will hear people saying, "I ken yer mukker, hes a braw lad." "The polis war pure metal wit ma 'cause I was mad wi it, and aye fell on mine bahoochie"

    :wink:

    Some people reckon that Scots should be taught in schools, and I aggree, its a pure dead gallis patter, yah ken? And theres aboot 1.5 Million in Alba wee the patter... Im aff, even some sasanaks fae the castle ken it
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2006
  20. Nov 25, 2006 #19
    Years ago, my first trip to northern Michigan. I went to someones home, and they invited me in saying..Have a seat on the Divan.
    I just stood there.
     
  21. Nov 25, 2006 #20

    Astronuc

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    Cows also 'have regional accents'
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/5277090.stm
    Very a-moo-sing. :biggrin:
     
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