Looking for a Quantum Mechanics Book for Non-Physicists?

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In summary, this book is an open access textbook that is designed to help bridge the gap between popular science articles and more advanced texts on quantum computing. It is designed for high school to college level courses.
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Hi all,

I have a simple question (apologies of this has been asked elsewhere, I am new here):

I am looking for a source on Quantum Mechanics for non-physicists. A little more detail on what I am looking for: I am a PhD in Discrete Maths/Optimization and I come from a pure Computer Science background. lately, I have been very interested in Quantum Computing. I like the level of detail, for example of Nielsen and Chuang's book (Chapter 2 is dedicated to the postulates and basic calculations on QM). However, I would like to go deeper into that stuff, and I am looking for a source that uses the same "vocabulary" as Nielsen and Chuang's book (Linear Algebra). I am not looking for detailed solutions of Schrödinger's equation etc.

If you have any suggestions, let me know. I tried Sakurai's book but this is not what I'm looking for. Actually, something like Susskind & Friedman book (from the theoretical minimum series) is exactly what I look for, but on more advanced level, but I do not know of this exists.

Cheers!
 
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psyspin said:
However, I would like to go deeper into that stuff, and I am looking for a source that uses the same "vocabulary" as Nielsen and Chuang's book (Linear Algebra). I am not looking for detailed solutions of Schrödinger's equation etc.
If you a quantum information point of view, you might want to look at @Demystifier 's recommendation. If you a quantitative introduction to quantum mechanics and elementary particles for interest's sake, you might want to look at "Quantum Mechanics and the Particles of Nature: An Outline for Mathematicians" by Anthony Sudbery. This book was written for final-year British mathematics students, and thus has no physics prerequisite. This book, unlike many physics books, has nice, crisp, somewhat abstract mathematics that has the flavour of linear algebra, but it does not dwell on mathematical rigour (i.e., nothing about the domains of unbounded self-adjoint operators). It doesn't spend much time solving differential equations, e.g., it uses an algebraic method to find the energy spectrum of hydrogen.
 
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  • #4
George Jones said:
If you a quantum information point of view, you might want to look at @Demystifier 's recommendation. If you a quantitative introduction to quantum mechanics and elementary particles for interest's sake, you might want to look at "Quantum Mechanics and the Particles of Nature: An Outline for Mathematicians" by Anthony Sudbery. This book was written for final-year British mathematics students, and thus has no physics prerequisite. This book, unlike many physics books, has nice, crisp, somewhat abstract mathematics that has the flavour of linear algebra, but it does not dwell on mathematical rigour (i.e., nothing about the domains of unbounded self-adjoint operators). It doesn't spend much time solving differential equations, e.g., it uses an algebraic method to find the energy spectrum of hydrogen.
Many thanks! That might indeed be what I am looking for: a book about the maths of QM, with minimal physics, in a linear algebraic formalism, that is not as elementary as Susskind and Friedman, and extends Nielsen and Chuang.
 
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Demystifier said:
Schumacher and Westmoreland is a general introduction to QM with emphasis on modern quantum information point of view. (Schumacher is the guy who coined the word "qubit".)
https://www.amazon.com/dp/052187534X/?tag=pfamazon01-20
I was not aware of that book, and many thanks for the suggestion. I am not into Quantum Information Theory but the table of contents of that book seems promising!
 
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On a different level: Ghirardi's "Sneaking a look..." :)
 
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Have a look at the open access textbook Quantum Computing for the Quantum Curious by Hughes et al.

Description from the Springer website:
"This book is open access, which means that you have free and unlimited access.
Demystifies quantum computing, using only high school physics.
Bridges the gap between popular science articles and advanced textbooks.
Adaptable for courses ranging from high school to college."
 
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Related to Looking for a Quantum Mechanics Book for Non-Physicists?

1. What is the purpose of a QM book for non-physicists?

A QM book for non-physicists aims to provide an accessible and simplified explanation of quantum mechanics for individuals without a background in physics. It covers the basic principles and concepts of quantum mechanics in a way that is easy to understand and apply.

2. Is it necessary to have a strong foundation in physics to understand quantum mechanics?

No, a QM book for non-physicists is designed for individuals without a background in physics. It explains the fundamental principles and concepts of quantum mechanics in a way that does not require advanced knowledge of physics.

3. What topics are typically covered in a QM book for non-physicists?

A QM book for non-physicists typically covers topics such as the wave-particle duality, uncertainty principle, superposition, entanglement, and the Schrödinger equation. It may also touch on applications of quantum mechanics in fields such as computing and cryptography.

4. Are there any real-world applications of quantum mechanics?

Yes, quantum mechanics has numerous practical applications in fields such as computing, cryptography, telecommunications, and medicine. Understanding the principles of quantum mechanics can also lead to advancements in technology and scientific research.

5. How can I apply the knowledge gained from a QM book for non-physicists in my daily life?

While quantum mechanics may seem abstract and theoretical, its principles can be applied in everyday life. For example, understanding the concept of superposition can help in decision-making, and knowledge of quantum computing can aid in data security. Additionally, learning about the fundamental building blocks of our universe can deepen our understanding of the world around us.

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