Looking for a thermodynamics book that 'ties it all together'

  • #1
DrBanana
34
1
I am currently a highschool student, and while I've learnt a bit about thermodynamics such as the first and second laws, their implications, I'd like to know how that stuff relates to gases and (without going too deep into it) phase change. Due to the structure of our curriculum, I've learnt about the ideal gas equations, plus some stuff about real gases as well, but all of that has been in a non-cohesive way. As it stands, a lot of definitions given seem circular. So I would like a book that gives you a historical, chronological context and explanation of the gas laws, somewhat rigorous explanations of properties of real gases, and how that ties in to the laws of thermodynamics, of which I would also like some intuitive derivations (without getting into statistical mechanics).

To give an example of what I'm talking about, my book explains one or two things using the concept of vapour pressure, without explaining what that is. I'd like to know the physics about things like vapour pressure in a book that's more or less built from the ground up. I'm sorry if my post is too vague.


P.S. The word 'thermodynamics' in the title is just a placeholder, I'm not really sure what subject deals with this stuff.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #3
Atkins: Physical chemistry
Çengel: Thermodynamics
Reid, Prausnitz, Poling: The properties of gases and liquids
Smith, van Ness: Introduction to chemical engineering thermodynamics
...

##\ ##
 
  • #4
This might be advanced but try W. Greiner, Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics, Springer. It is a statistical physics book but the first section of the book is a recap on thermodynamics written for physicists.

In my personal view, one of the greatest problems I had learning thermodynamics is that many books are written for scientists in general and are full baggage that is only useful for chemists and engineers.
 
  • Like
Likes dextercioby
  • #5
pines-demon said:
In my personal view, one of the greatest problems I had learning thermodynamics is that many books are written for scientists in general and are full baggage that is only useful for chemists and engineers.
One can argue that all that baggage is why chemists/chemical engineers have a better undertanding of thermodynamics than most physicists.
 
  • Like
Likes PhDeezNutz and WernerQH
  • #6
Let's not argue. See post #1 ...
 
  • #7
It doesn't seem I can edit my post anymore so I'll say it here:

There's no one good book for this stuff but I've started reading Block by Block by Hanlon as Frabjous recommended, to get the historical context.

I don't actually own the books mentioned below and my thoughts are based on some skimming.

For the kinetics of gas molecules, and the gas laws, Atkins's Physical Chemistry and Schroeder's thermal physics seem to do a good job. Same goes for stuff up to the first law of thermodynamics. For the second law, Atkins doesn't seem to motivate things much and Schroeder seems to give a statistical explanation. I think I found a good straightforward derivation of entropy in Fermi's thermodynamics book, but I can't remember.

For phase changes, Atkins gives you some insight.
 
  • #8
I think you would need to know at least calculus to get a decent grasp on thermodynamics. Ie., studying the thermodynamics portion of any introductory calculus based physics course.

However, my training is in mathematics, and I was shy 4 physics courses for a double major in math/physics.

I did gain a few insights reading Linus Pauling general chem book my first year of college, but it was written a few decades ago, so I am unsure how out of date it is.

There is an excellent book, but it is an upper division physics book, Intro to Thermal Dynamics by Shroeder. Sadly you do not meet the requirements.

I would personally just settle with the explaination in Atkins Book, and use this as motivation to learn calculus and introductory physics.
 
  • #11

Similar threads

Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
11
Views
11K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
4
Views
3K
Replies
7
Views
939
  • Thermodynamics
Replies
10
Views
2K
Replies
22
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Thermodynamics
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
19
Views
2K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
15
Views
2K
Back
Top