M6.9 Central Mid Atlantic Ridge -- NOW

  • Thread starter davenn
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In summary, there was a Mw 6.9 earthquake on a parallel transform fault section, with some oblique slip motion, that was recorded on a seismogram and analyzed by Dave. The USGS provided information on the earthquake and its moment tensor, and there was around 40 minutes separation between the arrival of the P wave and the arrival of the surface waves. The surface waves continued for over an hour.
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davenn
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This Mw 6.9 is a bit east and on a parallel transform fault section to the Mw 6.5 that I posted around 2.5 weeks ago

It's coming in on my seismo now
http://www.sydneystormcity.com/seismograms.htm

USGS info ..
https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us7000bf3k/executive

The moment tensor "beachball" shows that it isn't a pure strike-slip motion
and that there is just a little amount of oblique slip motion as well.

20200830 - 0918  UT Mw 65 and 6.9, cntrl MAR.jpg

cheers
Dave
 
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A seismogram download after about 1.5 hours of signal received
There is around 40 minutes separation between the arrival of the P wave and the arrival of the Surface waves
The surface waves continued for over an hour ( I saved the image just before the surface wave train was about to over write the
first surface wave arrival)

200918  UT Mw 6.9 cntrl MAR zhi 2a.gif
 
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Hi Dave, thanks for sharing this information and the links! It's always interesting to see the activity on the seismograms and how it compares to the USGS data. I noticed the moment tensor as well and it's definitely an interesting mix of strike-slip and oblique slip motion. It's amazing how much we can learn about these earthquakes just from analyzing the data. Looking forward to seeing more updates from you in the future. Cheers!
 

Related to M6.9 Central Mid Atlantic Ridge -- NOW

1. What caused the M6.9 earthquake on the Central Mid Atlantic Ridge?

The M6.9 earthquake on the Central Mid Atlantic Ridge was caused by tectonic plate movement. The ridge is a divergent boundary where two plates are moving away from each other, causing stress and tension to build up and eventually release in the form of an earthquake.

2. Was there any damage or casualties from the M6.9 earthquake?

As of now, there have been no reports of damage or casualties from the M6.9 earthquake on the Central Mid Atlantic Ridge. This is likely due to the remote location of the ridge and the fact that it occurred deep below the ocean's surface.

3. How often do earthquakes occur on the Central Mid Atlantic Ridge?

The Central Mid Atlantic Ridge is a seismically active area, with frequent earthquakes occurring due to the constant movement of tectonic plates. However, not all of these earthquakes are large enough to be felt or cause significant damage.

4. Is there a possibility of a tsunami following the M6.9 earthquake?

Due to the location of the M6.9 earthquake on the Central Mid Atlantic Ridge, there is no immediate threat of a tsunami. However, earthquakes in this region can cause underwater landslides, which may potentially trigger a tsunami.

5. How do scientists monitor and track earthquakes on the Central Mid Atlantic Ridge?

Scientists use a variety of tools and technologies to monitor and track earthquakes on the Central Mid Atlantic Ridge. This includes seismometers, GPS sensors, and satellite imagery. They also rely on data from global earthquake monitoring networks to gather information about seismic activity in the region.

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