Mag 6.8 Earthquake, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

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In summary, a magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska, followed by magnitude 4.3 and 4.7 aftershocks in the Cook Inlet. The earthquake occurred at 1:30 a.m. Alaska time and was centered about 160 miles southwest of Anchorage. The USGS reports that the earthquake had a depth of 127.8 km, which resulted in little surface wave activity. It serves as a reminder to always be prepared for natural disasters.
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Astronuc
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http://news.yahoo.com/federal-agency-magnitude-6-4-earthquake-hit-southern-110243052.html
The earthquake struck about 1:30 a.m. Alaska time and was centered 53 miles west of Anchor Point in the Kenai Peninsula, which is about 160 miles southwest of Anchorage, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. About two hours later, a magnitude-4.3 aftershock hit the Cook Inlet, the agency said. A slightly stronger aftershock — magnitude-4.7 —hit the Cook Inlet at 5.29 a.m.

USGS reports 7.1
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us10004gqp#general_summary

Time
2016-01-24 10:30:30 UTC
Location
59.659°N 153.452°W
Depth
127.8 km - fairly deep though
 
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Astronuc said:
127.8 km - fairly deep though

Yeah as a result I didn't record it with much amplitude at the other end of the Pacific,
as it was deep enough to result in little surface wave activity

2016-01-24 M7.1 Alaska zhi.gif
Dave
 
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not as deep as some others

Wow, that is a pretty significant earthquake. I hope everyone in the affected areas is safe and that there is not too much damage. It's interesting to see how quickly aftershocks can occur after a major earthquake. It's also a good reminder to always be prepared for natural disasters like this. Thanks for sharing the update and the USGS report.
 

Related to Mag 6.8 Earthquake, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

1. What caused the Mag 6.8 Earthquake on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska?

The earthquake was caused by a sudden release of energy along a fault line beneath the surface of the Earth. The specific fault responsible for this earthquake is known as the Susitna-Nenana Fault.

2. How big was the Mag 6.8 Earthquake on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska?

The magnitude of the earthquake was measured at 6.8 on the Richter scale, which categorizes it as a strong earthquake. This means that it released a significant amount of energy and was capable of causing damage to buildings and structures.

3. Was there any damage or injuries caused by the Mag 6.8 Earthquake on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska?

There were reports of some damage to buildings and infrastructure, such as cracked roads and broken pipes. However, there were no reported injuries or fatalities as a result of this earthquake.

4. Is it common for earthquakes to occur on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska?

Yes, earthquakes are fairly common in Alaska due to its location along the Pacific Ring of Fire, a region known for its high seismic activity. The Kenai Peninsula in particular has experienced numerous earthquakes in the past, with the last major one occurring in 1964 with a magnitude of 9.2.

5. Are there any ongoing risks or aftershocks associated with the Mag 6.8 Earthquake on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska?

Although the initial earthquake was the main event, there may be aftershocks in the days and weeks following. These are smaller earthquakes that occur as the Earth's crust adjusts to the changes caused by the main earthquake. It is important for people in the affected area to stay informed and follow any safety precautions advised by local authorities.

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