Major in ComSci, physics grad school?

In summary, the individual has switched their major from physics to computer science in their third year of undergraduate studies. This allows for more career options, but they have already taken the necessary lower division math and physics courses for a physics major. They are wondering if they could still possibly get into a lower level Masters program in physics, with a focus on computational physics, after receiving a computer science degree. They are currently attending a UC in Northern California.
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I'm in my 3rd year and I just switched my major over to computer science from physics, as this allows me to keep my career options much more open. This means I've already taken the required lower division math/physics classes for a physics major.

Now, I know it'd be hard to get accepted to a physics PhD program from just a CS B.S., but could I at least get into some lower level Masters programs in physics (maybe with a computation physics emphasis?) if I decide that physics is what I really want to do post-graduation?

I'm doing undergrad in Northern California at a UC, if it helps.

Thanks
 
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The root issue isn't "can I get in". The root issue is that you are unprepared. If you want to do a graduate degree in physics, you are expected to have completed the coursework of an undergraduate in physics.
 
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CyberShot said:
I'm in my 3rd year and I just switched my major over to computer science from physics, as this allows me to keep my career options much more open. This means I've already taken the required lower division math/physics classes for a physics major.

Now, I know it'd be hard to get accepted to a physics PhD program from just a CS B.S., but could I at least get into some lower level Masters programs in physics (maybe with a computation physics emphasis?) if I decide that physics is what I really want to do post-graduation?

I'm doing undergrad in Northern California at a UC, if it helps.

Thanks

Again, while it may not completely apply to your case, you might want to read this thread and use it as a possible test on your ability.

https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=64966

Zz.
 

1. What is a ComSci major?

A ComSci major, or Computer Science major, is an undergraduate degree program that focuses on the study of computers and computational systems. It involves learning about programming languages, algorithms, data structures, and software development.

2. Can I pursue a ComSci major if I have a degree in physics?

Yes, you can pursue a ComSci major even if you have a degree in physics. Many universities offer a ComSci major as a second major or a minor, allowing students to combine their interests and skills in both fields. It is also possible to pursue a ComSci major in graduate school after completing a physics degree.

3. What are the career opportunities for a ComSci major with a physics background?

A ComSci major with a physics background can pursue various career opportunities, such as software development, data analysis, computer engineering, and research in fields like artificial intelligence and quantum computing. The combination of skills in both disciplines can also be beneficial for jobs in finance, healthcare, and other industries that rely on data analysis and technology.

4. How can a ComSci major with a physics background prepare for graduate school?

To prepare for graduate school, a ComSci major with a physics background should take courses in both computer science and physics, including advanced courses in algorithms, data structures, programming languages, and theoretical physics. It is also beneficial to participate in research projects, internships, and attend conferences and workshops in both fields to gain practical experience and build a strong academic profile.

5. What are the benefits of pursuing a ComSci major and physics graduate school?

Pursuing a ComSci major and physics graduate school can provide a well-rounded education and open up diverse career opportunities. The combination of skills in computer science and physics can lead to innovative solutions and advancements in various fields, including technology, healthcare, and finance. It can also provide a strong foundation for further research and academic pursuits in cutting-edge fields like quantum computing and artificial intelligence.

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