Major or minor -- Which do you find more pleasing?

In summary: I personally find minor chords as having a very resonant sound. Some find Major chords as being the more resonant (this group views minor chords as dissonant). Others prefer minor chords, also symphonies and songs set in minor keys. Timbre is an important factor in the overall sound and can depend on the composition and arrangement of different frequencies. Some favorite chords include diminished sevenths and 7th chords as transitions in triads. Certain songs, like "Do you know the way to San Jose" and the theme from "Superman" use these chords effectively. However, personal taste varies and there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to the most pleasing triad. Some prefer the complexity and experimentation of composers like Deb
  • #71
DennisN said:
I just want to state for the record that I am absolutely terrible at drums. :oldlaugh:
And I've actually tried a bit to learn some drums, even from very good drummers I know (at least 3 :biggrin:).
But I ain't got it in me, I can't hold the tempo, unless it's a very, very simple beat.

I tried rehearsing drums to help a fellow band who hadn't a drummer at that moment.
But we gave up after an hour or so, I simply could not make it. :biggrin:

But I know how to program drum machines, that I've done quite a lot :smile:.
I can play all the band instruments but I only play drums well because I was taught at an early age, everything else was, "can you show me how to do that?" to my fellow band members.
Keeping a rhythm is easy enough if it is slow and straight but can go off if you add a fill while you are learning.
If you are concentrating like hell just on the rhythm then putting anything else in will be like just learning to ride a bike then taking one hand off the wheel.
Different thread but there is a lot of physics playing drums. From tuning and sounds to actual playing.
 
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  • #72
fresh_42 said:
Bassist wasn't paying attention during the session and asks the drummer:
"Hey, where are we?"
Answer:
"Why are you interested in that?"

On a football ground, there is a hundred bill on the kick-off point.
In the first corner is a bass player, in the second a saxophonist, in the third a drummer and in the fourth a drummer with timing.
Who will grab the hundred first?
the drummer, the sax player doesn't bend down for a hundred, bass players never move anyway, and there aren't any drummers with timing anyway.

Ok, I stop here. Seems we need a new thread.
Yep heard all of them Fresh. Drummers are the poor man's musician when we actually have the hardest jobs.
The first being the management of the fragile egos of all our fellow band members.
Stressful, no wonder we drink so much.
 
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  • #73
Ok right back on track. C6, why is it C6? Why not Am with a C bass? In other words when is a major a minor at the same time?
This is like Schrödingers chord.
 
  • #74
DennisN said:
I just want to state for the record that I am absolutely terrible at drums. :oldlaugh:
And I've actually tried a bit to learn some drums, even from very good drummers I know (at least 3 :biggrin:).
But I ain't got it in me, I can't hold the tempo, unless it's a very, very simple beat.

I tried rehearsing drums to help a fellow band who hadn't a drummer at that moment.
But we gave up after an hour or so, I simply could not make it. :biggrin:

But I know how to program drum machines, that I've done quite a lot :smile:.
That sounds like my proof of telling my girlfriend
 
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  • #75
pinball1970 said:
Ok right back on track. C6, why is it C6? Why not Am with a C bass? In other words when is a major a minor at the same time?
This is like Schrödingers chord.
C6 has the same notes as A minor 7, but is voiced as a C major chord with the 6th (A) in an upper voice as a color tone. Pre 20th century classical music would call it a 6/5 chord and would not use it as the resolution in a cadence they way it does in Jazz
 
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  • #76
BWV said:
C6 has the same notes as A minor 7, but is voiced as a C major chord with the 6th (A) in an upper voice as a color tone. Pre 20th century classical music would call it a 6/5 chord and would not use it as the resolution in a cadence they way it does in Jazz
When I hear it, a 6th, there is that sadness there but context and root note is everything.
Fool on the hill is a good example.
 
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  • #77
Another is the major 7th. It is a major chord but sounds so sad but in a different way to a minor chord. Sad and beautiful, like saying goodbye for the final time to someone you love.
A major chord is a beautiful sunny day, fields of corn, rolling hills, dusky horizon.
Sun sets give you the major 7th, the day is ending but a beautiful red sky (I am thinking East Anglia - amazing flat farm country, as English as it gets)
Night comes and now there are dark places, minor.
Diminished you find yourself in a wood.
Flat 7th flat ninth, Aug 5th or 7 # 9th you come across satan in the wood.
A chord for every occasion.
 
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  • #78
pinball1970 said:
Another is the major 7th. It is a major chord but sounds so sad but in a different way to a minor chord. Sad and beautiful, like saying goodbye for the final time to someone you love.
A major chord is a beautiful sunny day, fields of corn, rolling hills, dusky horizon.
Sun sets give you the major 7th, the day is ending but a beautiful red sky (I am thinking East Anglia - amazing flat farm country, as English as it gets)
Night comes and now there are dark places, minor.
Diminished you find yourself in a wood.
Flat 7th flat ninth, Aug 5th or 7 # 9th you come across satan in the wood.
A chord for every occasion.
1972 was peak major 7th chord for FM radio

 
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  • #80
fresh_42 said:
I like the diminished 7th.
The mathematical choice <0369> ,000402: only 3 of them due transpositional symmetries and invariant under inversion
 
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  • #81
A propos mathematical choice. Does anyone know the books by Guerino Mazzola? I have one titled "Groups and Categories in Music".
 
  • #82
fresh_42 said:
I like the diminished 7th.
I know, that is odd. In place as a turn around it can be fantastic. On its own it belongs in the wood at night.
 
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  • #83
BWV said:
The mathematical choice <0369> ,000402: only 3 of them due transpositional symmetries and invariant under inversion
Ha ha! Yes, it's minor thirds, 6ths and flat 5ths up and down.
 
  • #84
BWV said:
The mathematical choice <0369> ,000402: only 3 of them due transpositional symmetries and invariant under inversion
Actually the nomenclature never made sense to me. Why diminished 7th?
We have three symmetrical intervals and none of them are 7th.
There are 4 notes, built on minor thirds and we have flat 3rd, flat 5th and a major 6th.
Why 7th!?
All the explanations on the net do not make much sense either.
Apparently the 7th is diminished? The 7th in C is B, flat 7th is Bb.
A is the sixth, why refer to that as flat flat 7th?
Almost as bad population 3 stars.
 
  • #85
pinball1970 said:
Actually the nomenclature never made sense to me. Why diminished 7th?
We have three symmetrical intervals and none of them are 7th.
There are 4 notes, built on minor thirds and we have flat 3rd, flat 5th and a major 6th.
Why 7th!?
All the explanations on the net do not make much sense either.
Apparently the 7th is diminished? The 7th in C is B, flat 7th is Bb.
A is the sixth, why refer to that as flat flat 7th?
Almost as bad population 3 stars.
It is a naming convention that goes back to figured bass and is tied to the harmonic / contrapuntal context. While in equal temperament both a major 6th and diminished 7th are 9 half-steps, they are not the same thing. In A minor, the diminished 7th chord is G# B D F, starting from G# in the key, E is the 6th and F is the 7th. Likewise, an augmented 5th is notated differently than a minor 6th
 
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  • #86
BWV said:
It is a naming convention that goes back to figured bass and is tied to the harmonic / contrapuntal context. While in equal temperament both a major 6th and diminished 7th are 9 half-steps, they are not the same thing. In A minor, the diminished 7th chord is G# B D F, starting from G# in the key, E is the 6th and F is the 7th. Likewise, an augmented 5th is notated differently than a minor 6th
So the penultimate one? If you do everything from the root?
 
  • #87
pinball1970 said:
So the penultimate one? If you do everything from the root?
yes, similarly the interval from F to G# in A minor (3 half steps) is an augmented second, not a minor third
 
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  • #88
BWV said:
yes, similarly the interval from F to G# in A minor (3 half steps) is an augmented second, not a minor third
That makes no sense to me. I would never use that term although it may make sense technically/harmonically.
 

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