Major or minor -- Which do you find more pleasing?

In summary: I personally find minor chords as having a very resonant sound. Some find Major chords as being the more resonant (this group views minor chords as dissonant). Others prefer minor chords, also symphonies and songs set in minor keys. Timbre is an important factor in the overall sound and can depend on the composition and arrangement of different frequencies. Some favorite chords include diminished sevenths and 7th chords as transitions in triads. Certain songs, like "Do you know the way to San Jose" and the theme from "Superman" use these chords effectively. However, personal taste varies and there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to the most pleasing triad. Some prefer the complexity and experimentation of composers like Deb
  • #1
32
95
Which triad sounds most pleasing to you?
I personally find minor chords as having a very resonant sound. Some find Major chords as being the more resonant ( this group views minor chords as dissonant )
No right or wrong answer here. I am just curious as to others views.
 
  • Like
Likes pinball1970 and (deleted member)
Science news on Phys.org
  • #2
I like a diminished sept as the last chord of a triad. My favorite symphony is written in B minor.
 
  • Like
Likes pinball1970 and (deleted member)
  • #3
I prefer minor chords, also symphonies and songs set in minor keys. Unsure that resonance describes the experience. Timbre, perhaps.

I also like sevenths and diminished 7th chords as transitions in triads.

Timbre. Acoustics: the characteristic quality of a sound, independent of pitch and loudness, from which its source or manner of production can be inferred. Timbre depends on the relative strengths of the components of different frequencies, which are determined by resonance.
 
Last edited:
  • #4
fresh_42 said:
I like a diminished sept as the last chord of a triad. My favorite symphony is written in B minor.
Debussy?
 
  • #5
Opening chord of Hard Days night is so distinctive as a stand alone. Chord books have it as G11 so it has a 4th 7th and 9th

Context is everything tho.

I like the m7 flat5th done tastefully and that makes harmonic sense.

Great as a turn-around chord.

Best example I think of Do you know the way San Jose from the mater himself.

You have the chord resolving to a beautiful Cmaj7 then Em7 on B in the middle sectionEm7 Am7

L.A. is a great big ...

Em7 Am7 Em7C#m7b5 Cmaj7 Em7/B

In a week, maybe two, they'll ...
 
  • #6
Another stand out alone is that chord from Superman John WilliamsNothing on the net so I go this from Youtube and screen grabbed it.Left hand is F no third – nothing to see hear ; )Right hand is Cmaj 7!

So F no third plus Cmaj 7 gives us a…. er…. Fmaj9 b5th!That is how I would notate it but that does not mention the fact we have 5th and flat 5 together with added maj 7th and 9th but with no third.That is only because lowest not is F so counting that as tonic.Cmaj9/F a bit easier!

1677159279525.png
 
  • Like
Likes Astronuc
  • #7
pinball1970 said:
Debussy?
No, I am built very simple. Straight harmonies and melodies instead of any experiments. Hence, I love Beethoven and Tchaikovsky, The Beatles, ABBA, and Queen.

The symphony I meant above is the Pathétique, Tchaikovsky's 6th, best depressant ever!

And there is another strange thing: I love every song with a short tacet somewhere near the refrain.
 
  • #8
fresh_42 said:
No, I am built very simple
You're a mathematician. EDIT "EVEN" Your jokes confuse me!
 
Last edited:
  • #9
"Hence, I love Beethoven and Tchaikovsky, The Beatles, ABBA, and Queen." Excellent taste @fresh_42 but those guys were anything but simple ;)
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes DennisN and fresh_42
  • #10
pinball1970 said:
"Hence, I love Beethoven and Tchaikovsky, The Beatles, ABBA, and Queen." Excellent taste @fresh_42 but those guys were anything but simple ;)
Sure. What I meant was that I am simple. I need to hear a clear message, pleasant melodies, and harmonies. I know that their music is not simple in terms of composition.

Music such as free Jazz or Schönberg's twelve-tone techniques are things I really have to be in the mood for, which is very rare. And I do not like Mozart very much either. People didn't stop telling me how great he was, but they never convinced me. Yes, I do like The Magic Flute and his g-minor, however, in general, he annoys me. I am a Guiseppe Verdi guy.
 
  • Informative
Likes pinball1970
  • #11
fresh_42 said:
Sure. What I meant was that I am simple. I need to hear a clear message, pleasant melodies, and harmonies. I know that their music is not simple in terms of composition.

Music such as free Jazz or Schönberg's twelve-tone techniques are things I really have to be in the mood for, which is very rare. And I do not like Mozart very much either. People didn't stop telling me how great he was, but they never convinced me. Yes, I do like The Magic Flute and his g-minor, however, in general, he annoys me. I am a Guiseppe Verdi guy.
How about Bach? If you do not like Bach then part of me may die inside. EDIT He is THE mathematicians musician.
 
  • Like
Likes DennisN and fresh_42
  • #12
pinball1970 said:
How about Bach? If you do not like Bach then part of me may die inside. EDIT He is THE mathematicians musician.
Yes, I like Bach, and I love "Air on the G-string". I remember that I have seen the best performance ever to this music in figure skating (F, free skate). And I hate that I have forgotten her name.
 
  • Like
Likes DennisN and pinball1970
  • #13
fresh_42 said:
Yes, I like Bach, and I love "Air on the G-string". I remember that I have seen the best performance ever to this music in figure skating (F, free skate). And I hate that I have forgotten her name.
This?
 
  • Like
Likes Astronuc
  • #14
pinball1970 said:
This?
No. I think it was a Russian in a green costume and definitely a woman. And it's been quite a time since.
 
  • #15
fresh_42 said:
No. I think it was a Russian in a green costume and definitely a woman. And it's been quite a time since.
Ok I am curious now. I will search.

What do you think of this? For me? It is insanity in music BUT when the strings kick in? Wow. I would go to war with this in my ears.4.05 but don't skip. Headphones required
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes BWV
  • #16
pinball1970 said:
Ok I am curious now. I will search.

What do you think of this? For me? It is insanity in music BUT when the strings kick in? Wow. I would go to war with in my ears.4.05 but don't skip. Headphones required
I wouldn't turn it off if it was part of the night loop, but I wouldn't search for it either.
 
  • #17
fresh_42 said:
I wouldn't turn it off if it was part of the night loop, but I wouldn't search for it either.
These guys?
 
  • #18
Nope. Single. And IIRC a gold medaillist. But how many world championships and Olympics have there been between say 1990 and 2006?
 
  • #19
fresh_42 said:
Nope. Single. And IIRC a gold medaillist.
Ok. On it
 
  • #20
fresh_42 said:
Yes, I like Bach, and I love "Air on the G-string". I remember that I have seen the best performance ever to this music in figure skating (F, free skate). And I hate that I have forgotten her name.
This is good. How did someone come up with this? One person? And so many other amazing beautiful pieces?
Pure beauty and genius. No other way to describe it.
 
Last edited:
  • #22
fresh_42 said:
Nope. Single. And IIRC a gold medaillist. But how many world championships and Olympics have there been between say 1990 and 2006?
I am keen to stay on topic so in terms of great music and major and minor Ravel's Bolero is in C major but the tune is crazy.
First it just plays around the major scale nothing strange and very pretty.
The the Bb comes which sets the road to some really weird patterns. I don't know my modes but we are getting flat 5th, flat 9th, flat 7th and minor 3rd. That was used in 1984 Sarajevo, pairs.
Katarina Witt was 1988 GDR
No Russian lady winners after that.
1992- USA
1994- Ukraine (she wore pink and it was "rain in Spain")
Then USA and Japan till 2006.
 
  • #23
Air on a G string. This arrangement is in C because of the open strings but it was originally in D major.
It doesn't sound major because it moves around and quickly hits you with those amazing passing notes.

 
  • #24
A minor. Is this the best 2nd movement in a symphony ever? There is so much that is great about it that I feel inadequate to describe it technically. I am not classically trained.
There is a weird major part but I would need the music. Anyway it is one of those ethereal pieces.
The minors have it at the moment for me.


 
  • Love
  • Like
Likes hutchphd and fresh_42
  • #25
I just figured out that my favorite symphonies and piano concerts are all in minor:

Tchaikovski's 6th: b-minor
Beethoven's 9th: d-minor
Bruckner's 9th: d-minor
Mozart's 40th: g-minor
Tchaikovsky's 1st piano concert: b-minor
Beethoven's piano sonata 14: #c-minor

I smell a pattern ...
 
  • Like
Likes pinball1970
  • #26
So what do you thnk of Wagner?
 
  • #27
hutchphd said:
So what do you thnk of Wagner?
The Flying Dutchman is a good introduction to the world of operas: short and easy listening.

Besides that, the same applies to Wagner as to Mozart: there had been girls in my life (two different ones) who tried to convince me about their, the composers', ingeniousness but both failed. I like to quote Rossini:
Gioachino Antonio Rossini said:
Wagner has divine moments and hellish quarters of an hour.

The Tannhäuser overture is a good piece to put yourself in a positive, strong mood. After it, you can leave the theater.
 
Last edited:
  • Haha
Likes DennisN, hutchphd and pinball1970
  • #28
Ok I have a couple of majors.
 
  • #29
Debussy. Db major
 
  • Like
Likes Astronuc and fresh_42
  • #30
E major. I think this is my favourite piano piece.
 
  • Like
Likes fresh_42
  • #31
I think this is major. Hard to tell where it goes. It feels minor! Anyway he is a Brit so I have stick a couple in.

 
  • Like
Likes Astronuc
  • #32
Last one. 4.13am here and I am scouring YouTube for beautiful pieces in major keys! One sharp so G major.

 
  • Love
Likes Astronuc
  • #33
pinball1970 said:
Ok I have a couple of majors.
I looked it up. Thankfully, I found E-major for that one which I really love. Nowhere Man.
 
  • Like
Likes pinball1970
  • #34
There's Cannibal and the Headhunter's Land of a Thousand Dances. Is it major or minor? How about The Beatles' In My Life? Laura Branigan's disco hit Gloria?

The overwhelming majority of music sticks to a scale of seven or fewer notes. The few exceptions include The Beatles two main soundtrack albums and some of the melodies of Charlie Parker. His Anthropology might contain all twelve notes.

Then there's the music of east Asia which has more than twelve notes. In the West those notes are only sung by little children.
 
  • #35
fresh_42 said:
Yes, I do like The Magic Flute and his g-minor, however, in general, he annoys me.
What's the problem? Is it "too many notes"? (see below :biggrin:)

 
  • Haha
Likes pinball1970
<h2>1. What is the difference between major and minor keys?</h2><p>The difference between major and minor keys is in the intervals or distances between the notes. In a major key, the interval between the first and third note of the scale is a major third, while in a minor key, it is a minor third. This difference in intervals gives each key a distinct sound and emotional quality.</p><h2>2. Which key is more commonly used in popular music?</h2><p>Major keys are more commonly used in popular music, as they tend to sound brighter and more upbeat. However, minor keys are also used in popular music, especially in genres such as rock, blues, and jazz, where they can convey a sense of melancholy or intensity.</p><h2>3. How do major and minor keys affect the mood of a song?</h2><p>Major keys are generally associated with happy or positive emotions, while minor keys are associated with sad or somber emotions. This is due to the different intervals and tonal qualities of each key. However, the use of major or minor keys is not a strict rule, and composers can use these keys to create a variety of moods and emotions.</p><h2>4. Can a song change from major to minor or vice versa?</h2><p>Yes, a song can change from major to minor or vice versa. This is known as a key change or modulation. It is a common technique used in music to add variety and interest to a song. A key change can also alter the mood and emotional impact of a song.</p><h2>5. How do you determine whether a song is in a major or minor key?</h2><p>To determine whether a song is in a major or minor key, you can listen to the overall tonal quality and emotional impact of the song. Major key songs tend to sound brighter and happier, while minor key songs sound darker and more somber. Additionally, you can also look at the chord progressions and melody of the song, as they can provide clues about the key.</p>

1. What is the difference between major and minor keys?

The difference between major and minor keys is in the intervals or distances between the notes. In a major key, the interval between the first and third note of the scale is a major third, while in a minor key, it is a minor third. This difference in intervals gives each key a distinct sound and emotional quality.

2. Which key is more commonly used in popular music?

Major keys are more commonly used in popular music, as they tend to sound brighter and more upbeat. However, minor keys are also used in popular music, especially in genres such as rock, blues, and jazz, where they can convey a sense of melancholy or intensity.

3. How do major and minor keys affect the mood of a song?

Major keys are generally associated with happy or positive emotions, while minor keys are associated with sad or somber emotions. This is due to the different intervals and tonal qualities of each key. However, the use of major or minor keys is not a strict rule, and composers can use these keys to create a variety of moods and emotions.

4. Can a song change from major to minor or vice versa?

Yes, a song can change from major to minor or vice versa. This is known as a key change or modulation. It is a common technique used in music to add variety and interest to a song. A key change can also alter the mood and emotional impact of a song.

5. How do you determine whether a song is in a major or minor key?

To determine whether a song is in a major or minor key, you can listen to the overall tonal quality and emotional impact of the song. Major key songs tend to sound brighter and happier, while minor key songs sound darker and more somber. Additionally, you can also look at the chord progressions and melody of the song, as they can provide clues about the key.

Suggested for: Major or minor -- Which do you find more pleasing?

Replies
88
Views
6K
Replies
95
Views
4K
Replies
858
Views
21K
Replies
33
Views
2K
  • Poll
Replies
13
Views
413
Replies
60
Views
2K
  • Poll
7
Replies
228
Views
18K
Replies
8
Views
763
Replies
28
Views
2K
Back
Top