Mathematical Methods Book That Uses SI Units

In summary, I'm looking for an undergraduate-level 'mathematical methods' or 'engineering mathematics' book that uses SI units for the purpose of self-study. I've had my eyes on Zill's Advanced Engineering Mathematics, but it seems to use US customary units. So ideally I'm looking for a book that covers roughly the same topics (ODEs, Linear Algebra, Vector Calculus, PDEs, Complex Analysis). The ones I'm currently considering are Stroud & Booth's Engineering Mathematics and Advanced Engineering Mathematics or Riley, Hobson & Bence's Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering. It seems a physics one would use SI whereas an engineering one would use American standard units since that is what the engineering profession uses
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Argonaut
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I'm looking for an undergraduate-level 'mathematical methods' or 'engineering mathematics' book that uses SI units for the purpose of self-study.

I've had my eyes on Zill's Advanced Engineering Mathematics, but it seems to use US customary units. So ideally I'm looking for a book that covers roughly the same topics (ODEs, Linear Algebra, Vector Calculus, PDEs, Complex Analysis).

The ones I'm currently considering are Stroud & Booth's Engineering Mathematics and Advanced Engineering Mathematics or Riley, Hobson & Bence's Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering.
 
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jedishrfu said:
It seems a physics one would use SI whereas an engineering one would use American standard units since that is what the engineering profession uses in the US.

What about Arfken or Boas or Nearing(dover for hardcover or free at his site)?

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=arfken+mathematical+methods+for+physicists&crid=392CQDERQL5S&sprefix=arfken,aps,208&ref=nb_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_2_6

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0471099201/?tag=pfamazon01-20

http://www.physics.miami.edu/~nearing/mathmethods/
Ah that makes sense, thank you!

Boas is a contender too, while Arfken seems to be higher-level than what I'm looking for. I'll check out Nearing too.
 
  • #4
jedishrfu said:
It seems a physics one would use SI whereas an engineering one would use American standard units since that is what the engineering profession uses in the US.
I don't recall seeing a physics math methods text where units played a big role since the focus is on mathematical relationships, not finding numerical answers.
 
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vela said:
I don't recall seeing a physics math methods text where units played a big role since the focus is on mathematical relationships, not finding numerical answers.
I see, thanks! That also makes sense in hindsight. The Zill book I leafed through had a lot of miles, feet, lb's and gal's, but it must be the characteristic of 'engineering maths' books, as @jedishrfu noted. So I'll just go for one of the 'mathematical methods for physicists' books.
 
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Just to bake your noodle, in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics we (in the US) do fuel pin linear heat rate in kw/ft.
 
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gmax137 said:
Just to bake your noodle, in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics we (in the US) do fuel pin linear heat rate in kw/ft.
There's always one gotcha in every crowd.
 
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Thanks for the advice everyone. I've narrowed it down to Riley/Hobson/Bence vs. Boas and went with Boas because it seems to contain more exercises. I've found a reasonably priced second-hand copy too.
 
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vela said:
I don't recall seeing a physics math methods text where units played a big role since the focus is on mathematical relationships, not finding numerical answers.
As an author of such a text, I can confirm this. I did discuss units and — more particularly — dimensional analysis since it forms an important part of the skills required and is a powerful tool.
 
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Argonaut said:
Thanks for the advice everyone. I've narrowed it down to Riley/Hobson/Bence vs. Boas and went with Boas because it seems to contain more exercises. I've found a reasonably priced second-hand copy too.
A good free resource to supplement any textbook is Paul's online notes:

https://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/

It's a great reference.
 
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Related to Mathematical Methods Book That Uses SI Units

1. What is the purpose of using SI units in a mathematical methods book?

SI units, or the International System of Units, are a standardized system of measurement used in scientific and mathematical fields. Using SI units in a mathematical methods book ensures consistency and accuracy in calculations and makes it easier to communicate and compare results with other researchers around the world.

2. How is the use of SI units different from other systems of measurement?

SI units are based on the metric system and use a decimal system for easy conversion between units. They also have a set of prefixes that can be used to represent values that are too large or too small, making them more convenient for scientific calculations. Other systems of measurement, such as the imperial system, do not have these features.

3. Are there any exceptions to using SI units in a mathematical methods book?

In some cases, other units may be used in addition to SI units. For example, in certain fields like aviation and marine navigation, non-SI units such as nautical miles and knots are still commonly used. However, the use of SI units is still encouraged and these non-SI units can easily be converted to SI units for consistency.

4. How are SI units related to the laws of physics and mathematics?

The use of SI units is closely tied to the fundamental laws of physics and mathematics. These units are based on universal constants and are defined in relation to these laws. This ensures that calculations are accurate and consistent, and also allows for the development of new theories and laws based on these units.

5. Are there any resources available for converting between SI units and other systems of measurement?

Yes, there are many resources available for converting between SI units and other systems of measurement. Online conversion calculators and conversion tables are easily accessible, and most mathematical methods books also include conversion factors for commonly used units. It is important to always double check conversions to ensure accuracy in calculations.

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