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Maths at later stages of career.

  • Math
  • Thread starter nimiprave
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

friends,

I have an unique circusmtance. I was wondering if you guys can throw some light into my thinking process. I'm an experienced software developer in developing business software solutions. I have a MS in computer science and it's been close to six years since I have finished my masters degree. I'm 33 years old now. As a kid, I was good at physics and maths. But with the course of time I lost all the knowledge as I don;t use them on day to day basis. However, my internal quest for the knowledge in mathematics and physics is kind of pressing un-happiness in my daily job. Now, I'm thinking of learning the mathematics again and use this knowledge in the astro-physics computing domain. But I'm running low in confidence and scared of the time that it would take for me to learn the math as I'm current job takes a whole lot of time. As all grown up's do I had lost the innocence and inculcated fear and the constant assesment of successful and failure behind any knowledge endeavour. Instead of learning just for learning my educated brain is constantly accessing the success behind the knowledge endeavour. I was looking for some inspiration or ways to realize my dreams. What do you guys suggest?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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I think you need a degree in math or preferably in phys. It is very difficult to learn math or phys away from university.
 
  • #3
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I think you need a degree in math or preferably in phys. It is very difficult to learn math or phys away from university.
He has a masters in computer science which is basically a math degree right there.
 
  • #4
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He has a masters in computer science which is basically a math degree right there.
This is just not true at all.

To the OP: if I were you, I'd evaluate how much time you have to actually study such a subject. Then proceed from there. Once you know how much time, say, per week that you could dedicate to your studies, then you can figure out where you should begin.

Be sure to realize that it'd be better for you to go back to school and get a degree, the structure and the light at the end of the tunnel are always more ideal. That said, self study can be accomplished successfully with the right amount of perseverance, dedication and interest. Good Luck.
 
  • #5
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I've periodically thought along these directions. I too have a MS in comp sci, and have been programming professionally for many years.

Things to consider:
1. How deep is the dissatifaction with your current job? Can you satiate the math/physics itch with self-study, and continue with your existing career path?
2. Could you get into grad school (and succeed) with your current knowledge base in the new area? If not, then I'd spend some self-study time brushing up on the pre-reqs. That'll keep the option of continuing at your current job open, instead of burning that bridge. Also, you'll find out if you enjoy studying again as much as you think you will.
3. What is the backup plan? What are the job prospects in astro-physics computing? If you make it out with the new masters (or Phd), but don't find a job in your area, then you'll have to answer to interviewers why you took all those years off, but then came back to business software programming.
 
  • #6
As u liked maths earlier I think your basic concepts must be clear in it....I also love maths but now in software company...I want to say you can learn either by taking degree in maths or can take guide from professor..
 

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