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Maxwell-Boltzmann Distribution (Statistical Mechanics)

  1. Jul 29, 2011 #1
    Im having a hard time visualizing the 2 level energy state that my professor is lecturing about in our discussions on the Maxwell-Boltzmann Distribution within our Thermodynamics section. He keeps saying the "molecule will jump up to the next level at a higher temperature" What exactly is he referring to? Is it the higher average energy for the system? AAAAHHHHH.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 30, 2011 #2

    ehild

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    A system of independent identical particles can be treated as a couple of individual particles all of them with its own single-particle wave function and energy, the sum of which gives the energy of the system. The individual particles can have only two states. Such a system can be, for example, particles in magnetic field. They have spin and the associate magnetic momentum and they can align with spin parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field. These particles can be bound in a crystal, so all their other degrees of freedom are frozen and the only difference is the energy of interaction with the magnetic field.

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