Method for metal fabrication

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Hello, I am a last year mechanical engineer student in Marocco, and i have no idea to solve a problem with my final year project, since we have never studied a thing about Metal fabrication.

The question is " give one method the Cone Deck could be formed in mass production assuming that flat pattern blanks are already cut.
With that method, prepare a simple process flow from raw material to finished part.
"
I have attached the 'cone deck' picture.

I need help please, i am lost.
 

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  • #2
Nidum
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How big is it and what thickness of what metal ???
 
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SteamKing
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Hello, I am a last year mechanical engineer student in Marocco, and i have no idea to solve a problem with my final year project, since we have never studied a thing about Metal fabrication.

The question is " give one method the Cone Deck could be formed in mass production assuming that flat pattern blanks are already cut.
With that method, prepare a simple process flow from raw material to finished part.
"
I have attached the 'cone deck' picture.

I need help please, i am lost.
So, you study mechanical engineering and you've never taken a course in machine design, drafting, or metallurgy?
 
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I do, metallurgy not really, we do study in paper & simulation & drafting using software, like, solidwork, catia, adams,, we don't do stuff really, we don't have needed equipment since it costs a lot.

I have attached more details about it's thickness and all.

Thank you very much for your help
 

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Thank you ! :)
 
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@Nidium

I have a similar question. I am having difficulty understanding what the raw material would be for this blank provided, and cannot properly understand all the components of the engineering drawing.

I have created a basic process flow as the prompt instructs, and would like to know if all my portions/steps are sequentially correct and make sense.

  1. Sheering force upon a sheet metal, with a safe clearance distance away from die.
  2. Drawing force punched unto blank held upon die.
  3. Blank force punched into blank at fracture point; sheet metal held upon die.
I am a Mech Eng. student but haven't taken a materials or manufacturing course yet. However, your help would be immensely appreciated for this prompt. Thanks!
 
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Nidum
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(1) The material is not specified but Aluminium or Mild Steel are commonly used for this sort of component . Most metals used in general engineering can be worked with press tools . Special very ductile grades of metals are available but ordinary general purpose grades are commonly used as well .

(2) There are two primary processes used in press tools :

Cutting where metal is removed from the blank - as in punching a hole .
Forming where metal is distorted - as in pressing flat metal into a bowl shape .

(3) In the cutting process :

The bottom part of the tool is a block that has a hole in it of same shape and size as the required cut out in sheet metal blank .
The top part of the tool is a plunger of same shape and size as hole in block .

Blank is laid on bottom block and top plunger comes down to cut through the blank and continue a short distance further .
The cut out piece may drop through the hole in the block or it may have to be ejected by a separate mechanism .

Block is commonly called a die and plunger is commonly called a punch . The hole in the die is very slightly larger than required cut out and/or punch is very slightly smaller .
Size difference allows for working clearance but is always kept to an absolute minimum .
Both punch and die have sharp cutting edges and have to be made from very special steels to withstand what is a very high load and often abrasive process .

Punch and die have to be kept in exact alignment . This is done by guiding the punch itself or by using slides on the press machine structure .

Large forces are usually needed for cutting .
Lubricants are sometimes used .

(4) In the forming process :

Actions are similar to cutting but die has a shaped cavity in it and punch has a matching shape but reduced in size all round working faces
by one thickness of metal being worked .

Metal blank usually has to be held down firmly all round forming area to prevent unwanted distortions .
Where possible cavity and tool profile are made smooth and with tapered sides so as to ease flow of metal , to prevent jamming and to ease removal of blank after forming .

More complex pressed out shapes are sometimes done in stages in sequential punch and die sets .

(5) Actual press tools as for example used for making car panels often have much more complexity than simple ones described above . There can be multiple moving parts for the cutting and forming and auxiliary moving parts for clamping blank and ejecting both finished part and waste material .

(6) Design of press tooling for making complex parts can be very difficult . In modern times this is aided by finite element and other modelling methods but traditionally it was done just using skill and experience .

This is a huge subject and cannot be covered properly in one posting . Please ask any questions you like .
 
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Please explain these processes in more detail:

Where possible cavity and tool profile are made smooth and with tapered sides so as to ease flow of metal , to prevent jamming and to ease removal of blank after forming .
- What are the cavity and tool profile?

(5) Actual press tools as for example used for making car panels often have much more complexity than simple ones described above . There can be multiple moving parts for the cutting and forming and auxiliary moving parts for clamping blank and ejecting both finished part and waste material .

(6) Design of press tooling for making complex parts can be very difficult . In modern times this is aided by finite element and other modelling methods but traditionally it was done just using skill and experience .
- Can you go into more detail for these two steps? What is the most efficient, sustainable, and easiest approach for ejecting waste material?
- What is a simple process for ejecting the made part?

I sincerely appreciate your help - truly!
 
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Nidum
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Press tool 01.jpg
 
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Nidum
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Tool profile is shape of punch .
Cavity profile is shape of hole in die .
 
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@Nidium

- Can you go into more detail for these two steps? What is the most efficient, sustainable, and easiest approach for ejecting waste material?
- What is a simple process for
ejecting the made part?
 
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Astronuc
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- Can you go into more detail for these two steps? What is the most efficient, sustainable, and easiest approach for ejecting waste material?
- What is a simple process for
ejecting the made part?
One is asking for a lot of information without knowledge of a specific application, e.g., process volume, as in limited run, short run, large run. One could stamp individual parts or several parts simultaneously depending on the volume.

Here is some examples - http://www.dekalbtool.com/tool-die-manufacturing-and-design.html

http://www.dekalbtool.com/deep-drawn-stamping-of-galvanized-steel-bus-roof-cap.html (video).

Please demonstrate some effort and do one's own research before requesting further information. One may search for "tool and die making/manufacturing".

Thread will be closed pending moderation.
 

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