Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

I Minimum distance required to reach maximum velocity.

  1. Aug 15, 2016 #1
    Hi there!

    I have a basic question here, hopefully someone can brush physics up for me.
    I have a motor that is capable of max velocity of 5000°/s, and max acceleration of 30000°/s².

    What is the minimum distance that the motor need to travel before it reaches that max velocity?
    Can it make it in 5°?

    AT
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 15, 2016 #2

    andrewkirk

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    No it can't. For constant acceleration, the equation you need is
    $$v^2=u^2+\frac12 as$$
    where ##u## and ##v## are initial and final velocity, ##a## is acceleration and ##s## is distance (or angle in this case) travelled.
     
  4. Aug 16, 2016 #3

    PeroK

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    A simple way to do this from first principles is:

    It takes ##5000/30000 = 1/6## seconds to reach maximum speed at max acceleration.

    The average speed during this time will be half the maximum speed. This is ##2500°/s##

    The angle rotated during this time is, therefore: ##2500 \times 1/6 = 417°##
     
  5. Aug 29, 2016 #4
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Minimum distance required to reach maximum velocity.
Loading...