Momentum homework but a velocity question

In summary, the question is asking how far a baseball will go if 70% of its initial velocity of 233m/s is directed upward and 70% is directed horizontally at a 45 degree angle, ignoring air resistance. The necessary information to solve this question is not provided, but by using the equation D=1/2A*t^2 and D=avg V*T, the total distance can be calculated by finding the time it takes for the baseball to reach its maximum height and fall back down, and multiplying that by the horizontal velocity.
  • #1
iuhoosierz
10
0
This is momentum homework but a velocity question. I can't even figure out where to start with this one. The question is "For your answer for question E (which was V=233m/s) 70% of that velocity goes upward and 70% goes horizontally (45 degree angle). How far will the baseball go (ignoring air resistance)?

I am not given time so not really sure how to do this one. I was going to try the distance equations of D=1/2A*t^2 and D=avg V*T but I don't have enough info to use those.

Can anyone tell me where to start?
Thanks
 
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  • #2
You can figure out the time. You know the initial velocity in the vertical direction, so how long does it take to reach max height? To fall back down to the ground?
 
  • #3
So the initial velocity in the vertical direction is 163m/s. Do I need to factor in gravity? So would I take 163m/s / 10m/s? So the time to reach it's max height would be 16.3 seconds? I don't think that sound right
 
  • #4
Of course you must factor in gravity! But you're doing fine, using v=gt. Sounds good to me. Keep going.
 
  • #5
So since the volocity of 163m/s is the same in the horizontal direction would I do the same thing? V=gt?
 
  • #6
No. Gravity only affects the vertical motion. What's the total time the baseball is in the air? How fast does it move horizontally? How far does it get?
 
  • #7
total time would be 32.6s? It's going 163m/s horizontally so would it be D=avg v*t?
 
  • #8
Sounds good to me.
 
  • #9
So the total distance is 5313.8m? That seems really far
 
  • #10
It's moving pretty fast. And we're neglecting air resistance.
 
  • #11
ok thanks for all your help!
 

Related to Momentum homework but a velocity question

1. What is momentum and how is it different from velocity?

Momentum is a measure of an object's motion, determined by its mass and velocity. It is different from velocity because velocity only measures the speed and direction of an object's motion, while momentum takes into account the mass of the object as well.

2. How do you calculate momentum?

Momentum is calculated by multiplying an object's mass by its velocity. The formula for momentum is p = mv, where p is momentum, m is mass, and v is velocity.

3. Can an object have momentum without having velocity?

No, an object cannot have momentum without having velocity. Velocity is a necessary component in the calculation of momentum.

4. How does momentum affect collisions?

Momentum is conserved in a closed system, meaning that the total momentum before a collision is equal to the total momentum after the collision. This means that in a collision, the total momentum of the objects involved will remain the same, but it may be distributed differently among the objects.

5. How does the law of conservation of momentum apply to real-world situations?

The law of conservation of momentum applies to all closed systems, including real-world situations. For example, in a car crash, the total momentum of the cars before and after the collision will be equal, even if the cars experience changes in velocity and direction. This law also applies to other situations such as sports, where the momentum of players and equipment must be taken into account for successful plays.

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