More than just a momentum problem

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In summary, the question is asking for the speed of the block of wood after a bullet traveling at 721 m/s strikes it, causing the bullet to emerge from the other side at 349 m/s. Using the conservation of momentum formula, the speed of the block can be calculated as [(0.0058kg)(721 m/s) - (0.0058kg)(349m/s)]/(0.744 kg). The correct answer can be obtained by checking for any arithmetic errors.
  • #1
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When a bullet traveling at 721 m/s strikes a block of wood originally at rest on a frictionless surface, the bullet emerges from the other side of the block of wood traveling at 349 m/s. If the mass of the bullet is 5.38 g and the mass of the block is 744 g, what is the speed of the block after the collision?


I don't know what to do, I tried doing m1v1 + m2v2 = m1v1' + m2v2', and I couldn't get the answer. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Homework Statement

 
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  • #2
macgirl06 said:
I don't know what to do, I tried doing m1v1 + m2v2 = m1v1' + m2v2', and I couldn't get the answer.
But this is "just" a conservation of momentum problem, so that should work. Show exactly what you did. What values did you use?
 
  • #3
I did the following:

(0.0058kg)(721 m/s) - (0.0058kg)(349m/s) \ 0.744 kg

and that didnt work

and thnks for the fast reply
 
  • #4
macgirl06 said:
I did the following:

(0.0058kg)(721 m/s) - (0.0058kg)(349m/s) \ 0.744 kg
That looks perfectly OK to me:
Speed of block = [(0.0058kg)(721 m/s) - (0.0058kg)(349m/s)]/(0.744 kg)

Check your arithmetic; perhaps you made an error there.
 
  • #5
I have tried that many many times, are you sure there arent any tricks to this question or something you have overlooked?
 
  • #6
This is as straightforward a momentum conservation problem as you are likely to find. What answer did you get and why do you think it's wrong?
 
  • #7
I got it, it was just a calculational error. Thanks for the clarification!
 

1. What is a "momentum problem" in science?

A momentum problem in science refers to a situation where momentum, which is the product of an object's mass and velocity, is involved. This can occur in various fields of science, such as physics, chemistry, and engineering, and can involve different types of momentum, such as linear, angular, or rotational momentum.

2. How is "More than just a momentum problem" different from a regular momentum problem?

The phrase "more than just a momentum problem" is often used to emphasize that a particular situation or phenomenon involves more complexities and factors than just the basic principles of momentum. This can include additional forces, variables, or considerations that make the problem more challenging and require a deeper understanding of the underlying principles.

3. Can you provide an example of "More than just a momentum problem" in science?

One example of "more than just a momentum problem" in science is the motion of a pendulum. While the basic principles of momentum can be used to understand the motion of a pendulum, it also involves other factors such as gravity, friction, and the length of the pendulum, making it a more complex problem than just a simple momentum calculation.

4. How can scientists approach "More than just a momentum problem"?

To approach "more than just a momentum problem", scientists must first identify all the relevant forces, variables, and factors involved in the problem. They must then use their understanding of the underlying principles, such as Newton's laws of motion, to develop a mathematical model that can accurately describe the behavior of the system. This model can then be used to make predictions and solve the problem.

5. Why is it important for scientists to understand "More than just a momentum problem"?

Understanding "more than just a momentum problem" is crucial for scientists as it allows them to accurately describe and predict the behavior of complex systems in nature. This knowledge is essential for many fields, including engineering, physics, and chemistry, and can lead to advancements in technology and our understanding of the world around us.

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