My Avast Premium Security Gives Me This Scary Message

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In summary: You are right.Right, untrusted PDF files are often a source of malware. I was basically saying that removing flash player won't hinder the ability of opening PDF files on the browser.
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kyphysics
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Threat secured

We've safely aborted connection on 9.tlu.dl.delivery.mp.microsft.com because it was infected with SWF:CVE-2014-0543 [Expl]

The above message keeps popping up several times per hour since this morning. I looked up the "SWF..." thing and Google seems to suggest it is some vulnerability associated with Adobe Flash.

The problem is, I can't seem to find Adobe Flash installed on my computer. I typed "Control Panel" and clicked the uninstall tab to see a list of programs. Adobe Flash is not listed. Could it be "listed" elsewhere? If so, how can I find and uninstall it? Is it possible I don't even have Adobe Flash installed and this warning message from my Avast is referring to something else? Is seems scary, because it seems to suggest I was/am connected to some Microsoft program/URL. . .yet, my browser has no tab opened to that link/URL listed. I'm confused what the heck this all means and how scary of a situation this is for me (e.g., should I flat out use a new computer and consider mine infected/compromised right now)?

Major thanks for any help you all may provide!
 
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  • #2
CVE-2014-0543 is indeed a vulnerability of Adobe Flash player and Adobe Air sdk. Here are some details:

1622648594649.png


You have to uninstall Adobe Flash Player by downloading and executing the uninstaller given here:

https://helpx.adobe.com/flash-player/kb/uninstall-flash-player-windows.html
 
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  • #3
re: Adobe Flash Player

Is the AFP not the default way of reading PDF files/documents? I seem to recall this to be the case, but don't know. If so, what is a safe way of reading a PDF file?

If you open it in a browser (such as Chrome or Edge), would there be some AFP "components" involved at all? Like would AFP be built into those browsers by chance or would they be free from AFP and thus safe to read PDF files with?
 
  • #4
kyphysics said:
re: Adobe Flash Player

Is the AFP not the default way of reading PDF files/documents? I seem to recall this to be the case, but don't know. If so, what is a safe way of reading a PDF file?

If you open it in a browser (such as Chrome or Edge), would there be some AFP "components" involved at all? Like would AFP be built into those browsers by chance or would they be free from AFP and thus safe to read PDF files with?
Adobe Flash Player is dead. It is necessary almost nowhere; and you shouldn't be visiting websites which require it.

Flash Player and Adobe's PDF reader are entirely different. Browsers come with PDF reader plugins nowadays, and they don't depend on flash; they only need JavaScript.
 
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  • #5
Wrichik Basu said:
Adobe Flash Player is dead. It is necessary almost nowhere; and you shouldn't be visiting websites which require it.

Flash Player and Adobe's PDF reader are entirely different. Browsers come with PDF reader plugins nowadays, and they don't depend on flash; they only need JavaScript.
Oh, I see. Thanks for the feedback.

So, basically, if opening a PDF file in Chrome or Edge, there should be no problem, b/c they don't rely on AFP and that would not be something "attached" to the browser to read those files. So, I don't have to worry.

*no need to respond to this post if my conclusions are accurate - I'm just talking aloud my thoughts* Thanks again. :smile:
 
  • #6
kyphysics said:
So, basically, if opening a PDF file in Chrome or Edge, there should be no problem, b/c they don't rely on AFP and that would not be something "attached" to the browser to read those files. So, I don't have to worry.
You are right.
 
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pbuk said:
Not necessarily, here are some of the vulnerabilities that have been reported (and now fixed) in Chrome and in Edge:
https://www.cvedetails.com/google-search-results.php?q=chrome+pdf&sa=Search
https://www.cvedetails.com/google-search-results.php?q=edge+pdf&sa=Search

Don't look at a PDF file (or any attachment) you cannot verify is trustable.
Right, untrusted PDF files are often a source of malware. I was basically saying that removing flash player won't hinder the ability of opening PDF files on the browser.
 
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Related to My Avast Premium Security Gives Me This Scary Message

1. Why am I receiving a scary message from Avast Premium Security?

Avast Premium Security is designed to protect your computer from potential threats, and sometimes it may detect a suspicious file or activity that triggers a warning message. This is a precautionary measure to ensure your safety.

2. What should I do when I receive a scary message from Avast Premium Security?

If you receive a scary message from Avast Premium Security, it is best to take it seriously and follow the recommended actions. This could include running a scan, quarantining a file, or updating your software. Ignoring the message could put your computer at risk.

3. Can I trust the scary message from Avast Premium Security?

Yes, you can trust the scary message from Avast Premium Security. The software is constantly updated and uses advanced technology to detect potential threats. However, if you are unsure about the message, you can always contact Avast customer support for assistance.

4. Can I disable the scary messages from Avast Premium Security?

While it is not recommended to disable the warning messages from Avast Premium Security, you can adjust the sensitivity level of the software. This can be done in the settings menu, where you can choose the level of protection that best suits your needs.

5. Is Avast Premium Security worth it if it gives me scary messages?

Yes, Avast Premium Security is worth it even if it gives you scary messages. These messages are a sign that the software is actively protecting your computer and keeping it safe from potential threats. It is always better to be cautious and have a reliable antivirus program to protect your device.

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