NASA connection to EM drive research

In summary, the conversation discusses a five-year-old post on NASA's website that exposes flaws in the theory and results of the futuristic EM drive experiment. While the results have not been replicated and there are doubts about its effectiveness, NASA continues to fund the project due to the potential of wild ideas. However, there has not been any significant progress or new information since then. The topic has been previously discussed on a forum but will remain closed until new peer-reviewed information is available.
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nomadreid
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The following is a five-year-old post on one of NASA's websites.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/201...StAxsTjIuS3b08fUOyMcPh1-nBjeiwgwWkI3H7jnA0Has

It exposes the holes in the state of affairs at that moment -- first, the article does explicitly mention that the supposed theory for the supposed thrust is rubbish, so OK. It also implies that the positive results announced from experiment have not yet been replicated, so these results remain dubious. Also that the results of the NASA team were mentioned in a blog rather than a peer-reviewed paper seems odd. So, it is nonetheless funded by NASA probably because the stakes are so high -- wild ideas sometimes produce results, so NASA gambles. However, has there been any more serious attempts at replication or possible explanations of why such a thing should work since then?
 
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This topic and the associated peer reviewed paper by NASA has already been discussed here: https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/nasas-em-drive.884753/

Until new peer reviewed information becomes available it will remain closed for further discussion on PF.
 
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Related to NASA connection to EM drive research

1. What is the EM drive and how does it work?

The EM drive, or electromagnetic drive, is a proposed propulsion system that uses electromagnetic waves to generate thrust without the need for propellant. It works by bouncing microwaves back and forth in a closed cone-shaped chamber, creating a difference in radiation pressure that results in a net thrust in one direction.

2. What is NASA's involvement in EM drive research?

NASA has conducted several experiments and studies on the EM drive, starting in 2014 when a team at the Johnson Space Center reported positive results. Since then, multiple NASA facilities, including Eagleworks and the Advanced Propulsion Physics Laboratory, have continued to investigate the technology and its potential for space travel.

3. What are the potential applications of the EM drive?

If proven to be a viable technology, the EM drive could revolutionize space travel by providing a more efficient and cost-effective method of propulsion. It could potentially be used for long-distance space travel, reducing the need for refueling and decreasing travel time. It could also be used for satellite propulsion and in other space missions.

4. What is the current status of NASA's EM drive research?

NASA's research on the EM drive is ongoing, with various studies and experiments being conducted to further understand the technology and its potential. While some initial results have shown promise, the technology is still in the early stages of development and more research is needed to confirm its effectiveness.

5. What are the challenges and criticisms facing the EM drive?

One of the main challenges facing the EM drive is the lack of a clear scientific explanation for how it works. The concept goes against the laws of physics, specifically the conservation of momentum, which has led to skepticism and criticism from the scientific community. Additionally, many studies have not been able to replicate the initial positive results, raising doubts about the technology's validity.

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