Newton law, An object hanged with a robe that has a weight.

In summary: presumably at the tail where it's not pulling?presumably at the tail where it's not pulling?presumably at the tail where it's not pulling?
  • #1
chawki
506
0

Homework Statement


An object 50kg is hanged with a wire that wights 12,2kg


Homework Equations


what's the tension in the robe


The Attempt at a Solution


W - T = 0
(50+12,2)* 9,81 = 0
T = 610.182 N
 
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  • #2
chawki said:

Homework Statement


An object 50kg is hanged with a wire that wights 12,2kg


Homework Equations


what's the tension in the robe


The Attempt at a Solution


W - T = 0
(50+12,2)* 9,81 = 0
T = 610.182 N

Is the mass of the wire all located at the 50kg object end, or is it evenly distributed along the length of the wire? If it is distributed, do you think this might affect the tension with respect to position along the wire?
 
  • #3
It is distributed.
 
  • #4
chawki said:
It is distributed.

Then you'll have to take that into account and develop an expression that yields the tension with respect to position along the wire. Or do you just need the maximum or minimum tensions?
 
  • #5
I' not sure, they just asked what's the tension in the robe.
I think the tension at both edges of the robe is the same?
 
  • #6
chawki said:
I' not sure, they just asked what's the tension in the robe.
I think the tension at both edges of the robe is the same?

Presumably by "robe" you mean "rope"? And this rope is really the same as the wire mentioned in the problem statement?

Consider a rope hanging under gravity from a fixed point. The top of the rope has to hold up the weight of the entire rope below it. The middle of the rope only has to hold up the half of the rope that is below it. The very bottom of the rope has nothing below it, so it does not have to hold up anything. What is the relationship between the magnitudes of the tensions at these three locations?
 
  • #7
Tension in string is constant if rope is massless

But here the mass is distributed so tension is different at different points of rope

at which point do u exactly need tension??
 

1. How does Newton's first law apply to an object hanging from a rope with a weight?

Newton's first law states that an object at rest will remain at rest and an object in motion will continue in motion at a constant velocity unless acted upon by an external force. In the case of an object hanging from a rope, the weight of the object is balanced by an equal and opposite force from the tension in the rope. Therefore, the object will remain at rest unless a force is applied to it.

2. What is the tension in the rope when an object is hanging?

The tension in the rope is equal to the weight of the object. This is due to Newton's third law, which states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The weight of the object pulling down on the rope is met with an equal force from the tension in the rope pulling up on the object.

3. How does Newton's second law apply to an object hanging from a rope with a weight?

Newton's second law states that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on the object and inversely proportional to its mass. In the case of an object hanging from a rope, the net force is the weight of the object, and the mass is the mass of the object. Therefore, the acceleration of the object is zero, as it is at rest.

4. Would the tension in the rope change if the weight of the object is increased?

Yes, the tension in the rope would increase if the weight of the object is increased. This is because the tension in the rope is directly proportional to the weight of the object. As the weight of the object increases, the tension in the rope must also increase to balance the weight and keep the object at rest.

5. How does the angle of the rope affect the tension and weight of the object?

The angle of the rope has a direct effect on the tension and weight of the object. As the angle of the rope increases, the tension in the rope decreases, and the weight of the object increases. This is due to the trigonometric relationship between the angle of the rope and the vertical and horizontal components of the weight force.

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