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No FEMALE won the Nobel Prize in physics!

  1. Feb 14, 2010 #1

    drizzle

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    Okay I know the woman Marie Curie, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903 with her husband, Pierre Curie. But seriously, is there not one who won the prize by herself... ALONE?!


    Guess what I'm thinking :devil:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 14, 2010 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Lisa Meitner

    Lisa Meitner should have won it, and didn't.
     
  4. Feb 14, 2010 #3

    Yeah, must be a terrible and ferocious conspiracy against women. Let's be serious.

    There is another women who won a Nobel in Physics, Maria Goeppert-Mayer .
    And years when Nobel is awarded to more than one person are very common.
     
  5. Feb 14, 2010 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    Maria Goeppert-Mayer won it in 1963. If you are concerned that no woman has ever won it singly, there are mighty few people who have - the last single physics prize was 1992, and since the 60's, the tradition is to jointly award it.
     
  6. Feb 14, 2010 #5

    mgb_phys

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    She won a second one for chemistry, but for doing what we would now consider to be physics.
     
  7. Feb 14, 2010 #6
    No one wins Nobel Prizes on their own nowadays anyways.
     
  8. Feb 14, 2010 #7
    Women have smaller brains. It's science.
     
  9. Feb 14, 2010 #8

    mgb_phys

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    And yet the blue whale, in spite of it's brain size, continues to be ignored by the color-biased Nobel committee
     
  10. Feb 14, 2010 #9
    What's the gender ratio among physics professors in the developed world? I believe it's 6:1 to 10:1 among Ph.D. students. 58 out of 65 faculty members in Harvard are men.
     
  11. Feb 14, 2010 #10
    They also have denser ones.
     
  12. Feb 14, 2010 #11

    turbo

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    Go, drizzle! My field is extremely out-of-favor, though there are interesting things to report. I hope you can cut through and get some recognition.
     
  13. Feb 14, 2010 #12

    Chi Meson

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    Re: Lisa Meitner

    I have a Periodic Table with the erstwhile "Hahnium" (105, now Dubnium). ANd now we have Meitnerium (109). Who's laughing now, Otto?
     
  14. Feb 14, 2010 #13
    Women do physics?
     
  15. Feb 14, 2010 #14
    There is a Nobel Prize in Physics?
     
  16. Feb 14, 2010 #15

    ideasrule

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    Not a lot of women like physics, either now or throughout history. Probably even fewer women like computer science, even though women probably have greater tolerance for the most time-consuming aspect of programming (guess what it is?) than men.
     
  17. Feb 14, 2010 #16
    I believe in the philosophy that if you see a problem go fix it!

    This is out of context, but in practice, I am more like if there is no (Engineering) problem go create (find) one.
     
  18. Feb 14, 2010 #17

    Pengwuino

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    Yah there's an extremely disproportionate number of men in physics than women so you think one could understand the extreme disproportionate number of male nobel prize winners.

    Makes you wonder why people make a stink when women only make up 4 of 10 positions on some random goverment chair or women score .0001% worse on some standerdized test yet you have a billion to 1 ratio of men to women in physics and no one cares.
     
  19. Feb 14, 2010 #18

    ideasrule

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    Where's the problem? I don't see the fact that men and women are interested in different things as a "problem". Diversity is a good thing, which is why evolution gave us sexual reproduction in the first place.
     
  20. Feb 14, 2010 #19
    From what I've read, men tend to be over-represented in physics and engineering whereas women are overrepresented in linguistics and law. I've also read that male brains tend to be slightly better with spatial-mathematical thinking whereas women tend to be better with language, patterns/relations, and memory.

    Based on this, I find it interesting that men tend to be overrepresented in fields such as physics and engineering whereas women are overrepresented in fields such as linguistics and law.
     
  21. Feb 14, 2010 #20
    If you don't see it as a problem, go find another one.
     
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