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Non nuclear part of a nuclear power plant

  1. Jun 9, 2009 #1
    Hi there,

    I have a simple question about nuclear power plant. There are two parts to it, which are the nuclear island (where the magic happens) and the non-nuclear part where the heat is transformed to electricity.

    Having to many languages in my head at the moment, could someone help me with the english term for this non-nuclear part, where the turbine is located. I have in mind the "conventional part" or the "power generation plant". Which one is used normally in English
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 9, 2009 #2

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    The core would refer to the portion of the system comprised of nuclear fuel where the fission takes place. The rest is 'balance of plant'.

    Here is a good reference based on a CANDU plant.

    http://canteach.candu.org/library/20054407.pdf [Broken]


    LWRs are either Pressurized Water Reactors or Boiling Water Reactors. The PWRs have a primary and secondary circuit separated by Steam Generators. The BWRs have one ciruit, whereby steam produced in the core is dried and sent directly to the HP turbine.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Jun 9, 2009 #3
    Hi there,

    Thank you for your answer. These informations I have.

    I guess a little more explanation would be helpful. First of all, except in a few countries, CANDU are not manufactured anymore. They are way to expensive for their efficiency. So I am talking about LWR (BWR or PWR). The nuclear fuel is within the core of the reactor. The reactor is placed inside a primary containment. The primary containment is surrounded by a secondary containment, anyway it should. All of this is called the Nuclear Island (NI). For safety reasons, the NI should be penetrated as little as possible.

    One of the main penetration of the NI is the trubine piping. This is where it differs for BWR or PWR: in a BWR the steam is produced directly in the reactor vessel, therefore inside the NI, which for PWR a secondary system (the steam generator) will remove the heat of the primary circuit. No matter which technology is used, their are other buildings than the NI in a power plant, like the turbine island for a PWR where the steam pushes the wings of the turbine to produce electricity.

    My question was how do you call this building where the electricity is produced. Since I am working between French, English, and German, I tend to make translation from one another that can give exotic results. Therefore, what is this turbine island called in English. From what I remember, it should be something like the "Power Generation Plant (PGP)". Could you confirm that.

    Cheers
     
  5. Jun 9, 2009 #4

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    The core is located in a pressure vessel, which we call the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV).

    The reactor and it's immediate equipment are in the Containment Building and the turbines are located in the Turbine Hall. The steam generation part is known as Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS).

    Terms seem to vary among English, German and French.

    I'll see if I can find a particular diagram of a power plant and find the formal terms.

    This might help - http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/basic-ref/glossary.html
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  6. Jun 9, 2009 #5
    Hi there,

    Thank you very much for the effort. I was to lazy to look up the formal terms myself. I also take a look around. But you might be right with the Auxiliary building, and the turbine hall.

    And the problem comes when German speak to French in English. Then it gets really confusing. There are directl translation from one language to English, and taken by the person from the other language. At the end of the day, I don't know which one is which anymore.

    Cheers
     
  7. Jun 10, 2009 #6
    All I can tell you is based on my experience in the US, working in PWRs. The turbine, condensers, condensate pumps, feedwater pumps, and feedwater heaters etc. are all collectively called "the secondary side" or "steam side" or "balance of plant." This last is frequently abbreviated to "BOP." In this name, the word "balance" is taken in the sense of "remainder" - the "balance" of the plant is the portions not included within the "NSSS" nuclear steam supply system. I think this division stems from the original contracts and construction, where the reactor vendor was responsible for the NSSS and the architect-engineer was responsible for everything else (the "balance of plant"). As astronuc says above, the BOP systems are within the structure of the "turbine hall" or "turbine building." Does that help?
     
  8. Jun 10, 2009 #7

    Morbius

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    gmax,

    With the one exception of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station [ SONGS ] in southern
    California. There is no "turbine building" - the turbine / generator are out in the open.

    http://www.californiacoastline.org/...e=200603563&mode=sequential&flags=0&year=2006

    http://www.californiacoastline.org/...ode=big&lastmode=sequential&flags=0&year=2006

    http://www.sce.com/PowerandEnvironment/PowerGeneration/SanOnofreNuclearGeneratingStation/default.htm?goto=songs [Broken]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Onofre_Nuclear_Generating_Station

    The reactors, of course; have containment buildings.

    Dr. Gregory Greenman
    Physicist
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  9. Jun 10, 2009 #8
    Greg -

    Your post is confusing - the SONGS turbines are indeed exposed. I haven't been inside that plant since the mid 1980's, and I just don't remember what they call it there.

    I thought the OP was asking for the terminology - the name. So, I was just relaying what the people working in the plant call it, and at several sites they call it "the turbine building." Whether it is "really" a "building" or not is a matter of opinion - it has no walls and no roof; OTOH, it has a substantial foundation, a massive steel frame, and concrete floors. Also, while some (southern?) plants have no enclosure (Turkey Point, SONGS, others), many other plants do typically have a 'building' to protect the turbine and its associated systems from the weather. The ones I have been in are more like giant sheds (corrugated metal & fiberglass walls and roofs).
     
  10. Jun 10, 2009 #9

    Morbius

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    gmax,

    As I recall, the structure upon which the turbine is perched is usually called a "pedestal".

    They may call it a "turbine building" for consistency.

    Dr. Gregory Greenman
    Physicist
     
  11. Apr 20, 2011 #10
    Even though the turbine/generator and MSRs are outside it is still referred to as the turbine building. After all it is still a structure. Some areas do have roofs and walls. The building is roughly 70' high with 5 to 7 different levels.

    The pedestal referred to earlier is the steel frame the turbine rotates on - similar to an engine block/crankshaft analogy. It contains all the oil ports for the bearings, bearing housing, etc.
     
  12. Apr 21, 2011 #11
    The turbine/generator are on the "turbine deck" which is housed in the "turbine building". Those are the only names I've heard around here.
     
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